Meet the A-Line Dress. All about all-over printing.

Round Hill Beach

Framed Prints

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$90.00
Get this by Dec 24

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Poete100

Joined February 2010

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Sizing Information

Small 12.0" x 7.9"
Medium 18.0" x 11.9"
Large 24.0" x 15.9"
Note: Image size. Matboard and frame increase size of final product

Features

  • Custom-made box or flat frame styles
  • High-quality timber frame finishes to suit your decor
  • Premium Perspex - clearer and lighter than glass
  • Exhibition quality box or flat frame styles

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Artist's Description

Round Hill Beach of South Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA

I rarely post anything from my Town of Dartmouth
but with this beach, I made an exception…

Photomatix Pro…of three captures with different setting
and no tripod…hand held as steady as I could & windy

Nikon D90-Nikkor 18-200mm lens, exp time 320 & 400
ISO 200, focal length 36mm, max aper 5.6, spot metering

Round Hill is a location in Dartmouth, Massachusetts of historical significance

Edward Howland Robinson Green, known as “Colonel” Ned Green, the only son of the renowned female tycoon and miser, Hetty Green, built his home on Round Hill after his mother’s death in 1916 left him with a fortune of between $100 and $200 million. The mansion was designed by architect Alfred C. Bossom and completed in 1921 at a cost of $1.5 million dollars.
In 1948, twelve years after the Colonel’s death, his sister and heir donated the entire property to MIT, which used the 240-acre (0.97 km2) estate for educational and military purposes. MIT erected a giant antenna atop a 50,000-gallon water tank on the site. Another was erected nearby for research towards the Ballistic Missile Early Warning System. The giant dish antenna stood as a local and marine navigational landmark until the current owners of the site, the Bevelaqua family, demolished it in 2007.
In 1964 MIT sold the estate to the Society of Jesus of New England as a retreat. Its upper floors were converted into 64 individual rooms, and its main floor reworked to include a chapel, conference rooms, and library. In 1968 the Jesuits sold much of the estate’s beach to the Town of Dartmouth in 1968, and then in 1970 sold the entire property to a local woman, Gratia R. Montgomery. She in turn sold most of the site to private developers in 1981, and the area is now a private, gated condominium community

Framed Prints Tags

beach scenery ocean

All Products Tags

beach scenery ocean

Artwork Comments

  • Poete100
  • Poete100
  • Fara
  • Poete100
  • John  Kapusta
  • Poete100
  • fauselr
  • Poete100
  • Vicki Spindler (VHS Photography)
  • Poete100
  • trish725
  • Poete100
  • Jack Ryan
  • Poete100
  • Thea 65
  • Poete100
  • peaky40
  • Poete100
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