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Fuller's rose weevil-Melbourne by patcheah
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I have only seen two fuller’s rose weevils in my garden. I thought they look rather cute until I searched on the internet and found out that they are pests.
From the internet:
Fuller’s rose weevil, also called the Fuller rose beetle, is a type of beetle that feeds on ornamental plants as well as fruit and vegetable crops. Some researchers believe that these pests originated in South America. They infest and damage plants in Europe, North and South America, Australia and Africa as of 2011. Fuller’s rose weevils feed on a variety of plants, particularly rose, citrus, peach, strawberry and potato plants. They also attack apple, avocado, walnut, banana, raspberry, plum and apricot plantings, among other species. Immature larval insects feed on the root hairs, while the older larvae devour main roots. Plants with damaged roots are susceptible to fungal root rot infections. Infested plants cannot absorb water or nutrients, and plants may wilt or die. Adult Fuller’s rose weevils feed on the foliage at night, sometimes devouring entire leaves.

more from the net:

The biology of the vine weevil is unusual. Nearly all vine weevils are female and they can lay viable eggs without being fertilised by a male. This ability to produce viable, unfertilised eggs is known as a parthenogenesis. Male vine weevils have been found occasionally but are very rare.

Adult wheat weevils when threatened or disturbed will pull their legs close to the body and feign death. Female weevils can tell if a grain kernel has had an egg laid in it by another weevil. They will avoid laying another egg in this grain. Females chew a hole, deposit an egg, and seal the hole with a gelatinous secretion. This may be how other females know the grain has an egg in it already. This ensures the young will survive and produce another generation. Researchers estimate that one pair of weevils may produce up to 6,000 offsprings per year.

Human Impact

Wheat weevils are a pest of many types of grain and may lay their eggs in wheat, oats, rye, barley, rice and corn. Wheat weevils cause an unknown amount of damage worldwide because it is hard to keep track of so much information, especially in places where the grain harvests are not measured. They are hard to detect and usually all of the grain in an infested storage facility must be destroyed. There are many ways to attempt to get rid of the wheat weevil. There are pesticides, different methods of masking the odour of the grain with unpleasant scents, and introducing other organisms that are predators of the weevils.

Featured in

All Creatures Great and Small 22nd April 2011

Closeups in Nature 23rd April 2011

All Things Photographic 28th May 2011

Nikon D7000
Tamron 90mm macro lens

My images do not belong to the Public Domain.
All of my photographs are copyright protected, All Rights Reserved. They may not be used for artist reference, blogged, reproduced, redistributed, copied or manipulated for commercial or personal use under any circumstances without my written consent.

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Comments

  • Ray Clarke
    Ray Clarkeover 3 years ago

  • swaby
    swabyover 3 years ago

    Thats so funny I do the same thing! I think a bug is so fabulous until I look it up! You capture this one with great detail and I have to admit it is kinda cute, for a bug! Fantastic macro!

  • Appreciate your visit and comment.LOL. Now I know my model is a pest ,what do I do? Feed her to the chooks or let her go so I have endless supply of models for my photography : ) No wonder I’m having lots of problems growing citrus and some other trees,they just die even with tender loving care! I have been trying to take pics of spiders and you should see the cobwebs in my house,they are there to stay until I get a decent images!

    – patcheah

  • swaby
    swabyover 3 years ago

    You go girl, cant wait to see them! And so sorry about your citrus trees, hope you can figure that out soon!

  • I have so much problems taking pics of spiders inside my house.They only come out at night but the minute you shine the torch on them ,they go back to the cracks in the window frame!

    – patcheah

  • Edge-of-dreams
    Edge-of-dreamsover 3 years ago

    Keep the bugs, bugger the trees. Can always buy lemons from the supermarket :-) Great macro Pat!!

  • LOL, Thanks Mia. The weevil is very cute,hides and camouflages very well in brown seed pods.They are very shy,goes quickly into hiding if they spot the camera lens. This was one lucky shot after many attempts.

    – patcheah

  • Trish Meyer
    Trish Meyerover 3 years ago

    Well captured ! They are cute, and I guess everything has some purpose in life, even if at time little critters like this one devastate one’s carefully tended plants. It will probably become bird food before long.

  • Thanks for stopping by Trish and your nice comment. Yes,that is the cycle of life,we all need every creature for us to survive. I must say my garden attracts lots of birds and bugs because I do not use pesticides artificial or natural at all and my garden is wild and rambling. : )

    – patcheah

  • Andrew Trevor-Jones
    Andrew Trevor-...over 3 years ago

    Pests, Schmests… It is only a pest to me if it is really causing major issues, otherwise it’s live and let live and I get the enjoyment from it. We get stink bugs on our citrus trees but even without control we still get fruit so I just enjoy them. As to your weevil, it is a cool looking insect and a great shot of it.

  • Thanks for your compliment Andrew. I like bugs ,pest or not,without them I’ll have no birds or other bugs in my garden and worst still ,no models for my photography : ) I am not sure if I read it right in the internet,it seems all weevils are females.I’m wondering who is doing all the fertilising of the eggs! Have to do more research into that.Fancy a world full of females?

    – patcheah

  • Andrew Trevor-Jones
    Andrew Trevor-...over 3 years ago

    That’s news to me about all weevils being female and is not mentioned in any of my books. It would make them an evolutionary dead-end as one of the major sources of variation and change would be removed.

  • They are called parthenogenesis,very interesting.

    – patcheah

  • Andrew Trevor-Jones
    Andrew Trevor-...over 3 years ago

    Are you talking about all species of weevils or just this species (and perhaps one population of this species)? There are many, many guides to species of weevils that describe the differences between males and females which more than implies that males exist. It may well be true for some species or some populations of a species. Parthenogenesis is a good short term strategy to get around a shortage of males as without it the population would die. However, it is a poor strategy long term as it significantly reduces variation in the population which lessens the ability for the population to survive changes in their environment. Also… be careful what you read on the Internet, it isn’t all true.

  • Yes,there are lots of different species of weevils. Might have to go to the library to source my information,like you said internet information is not always correct : (

    – patcheah

  • Elaine123
    Elaine123over 3 years ago

  • Thank you so much for the honour of this feature,greatly appreciated. Lovely to wake up to this beautiful banner : )

    – patcheah

  • Ray Clarke
    Ray Clarkeover 3 years ago

  • Thanks Ray for the feature,greatly appreciated. I am glad that you like it to be your fave : )

    – patcheah

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