Fuller's rose weevil-Melbourne

patcheah

Joined October 2010

  • Available
    Products
    9
  • Artist
    Notes
  • Artwork Comments 27

Wall Art

Home Decor

Bags

Stationery

Artist's Description

© All Rights Reserved. This image may not be copied, reproduced, published or distributed in any medium without my written permission.

I have only seen two fuller’s rose weevils in my garden. I thought they look rather cute until I searched on the internet and found out that they are pests.
From the internet:
Fuller’s rose weevil, also called the Fuller rose beetle, is a type of beetle that feeds on ornamental plants as well as fruit and vegetable crops. Some researchers believe that these pests originated in South America. They infest and damage plants in Europe, North and South America, Australia and Africa as of 2011. Fuller’s rose weevils feed on a variety of plants, particularly rose, citrus, peach, strawberry and potato plants. They also attack apple, avocado, walnut, banana, raspberry, plum and apricot plantings, among other species. Immature larval insects feed on the root hairs, while the older larvae devour main roots. Plants with damaged roots are susceptible to fungal root rot infections. Infested plants cannot absorb water or nutrients, and plants may wilt or die. Adult Fuller’s rose weevils feed on the foliage at night, sometimes devouring entire leaves.

more from the net:

The biology of the vine weevil is unusual. Nearly all vine weevils are female and they can lay viable eggs without being fertilised by a male. This ability to produce viable, unfertilised eggs is known as a parthenogenesis. Male vine weevils have been found occasionally but are very rare.

Adult wheat weevils when threatened or disturbed will pull their legs close to the body and feign death. Female weevils can tell if a grain kernel has had an egg laid in it by another weevil. They will avoid laying another egg in this grain. Females chew a hole, deposit an egg, and seal the hole with a gelatinous secretion. This may be how other females know the grain has an egg in it already. This ensures the young will survive and produce another generation. Researchers estimate that one pair of weevils may produce up to 6,000 offsprings per year.

Human Impact

Wheat weevils are a pest of many types of grain and may lay their eggs in wheat, oats, rye, barley, rice and corn. Wheat weevils cause an unknown amount of damage worldwide because it is hard to keep track of so much information, especially in places where the grain harvests are not measured. They are hard to detect and usually all of the grain in an infested storage facility must be destroyed. There are many ways to attempt to get rid of the wheat weevil. There are pesticides, different methods of masking the odour of the grain with unpleasant scents, and introducing other organisms that are predators of the weevils.

Featured in

All Creatures Great and Small 22nd April 2011

Closeups in Nature 23rd April 2011

All Things Photographic 28th May 2011

Nikon D7000
Tamron 90mm macro lens

Artwork Comments

  • Ray Clarke
  • swaby
  • patcheah
  • swaby
  • patcheah
  • Edge-of-dreams
  • patcheah
  • Trish Meyer
  • patcheah
  • Andrew Trevor-Jones
  • patcheah
  • Andrew Trevor-Jones
  • patcheah
  • Andrew Trevor-Jones
  • patcheah
  • Elaine123
  • patcheah
  • Ray Clarke
  • patcheah
,
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

10% off

for joining the Redbubble mailing list

Receive exclusive deals and awesome artist news and content right to your inbox. Free for your convenience.