Plant the Seeds of Growth Right Where You Are...

I was reading Barney Davey’s wise words of advice today and thought I would share some with you…
I have just added some excerpts of the article to keep the post short..
As always I appreciate your wonderful comments and feedback as it enables me to decide whether I should continue to write the journal
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Davey believes in growing your art buying public right where you live and wonders how many of you tell your friends and family when you have new work to sell..

“Have you supplied them with postcards, sales sheets, or other art marketing materials to give to others? In your professional circle, how many contacts have bought your art?
How many professionals do you use in your life? Do your doctor, your lawyer, your CPA, and bookkeeper own your art? Have you shown them your art? Do your friends, family or professional relationships regularly refer prospects to you?
You have people all around you who might buy your art, or they might know someone who will buy your art. If you practice, you can learn genuinely to ask these potential buyers and centers of influence to buy your art or refer you to prospects that will
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He strongly feels that if you are successful at this level you will create a solid foundation for “more extensive marketing efforts”…you don’t need a large budget for this as most can be done by email these days…
When I started to show my work online I created and mailed out an online newsletter to friends and family to keep them up to date on new work, shows, and news in general
…see sample below..


First Issue of Arts and Letters

Even if you have a FB page a newsletter can be even more attractive with copies of your images and a more comprehensive story, without the distraction of other FB posts…
You can include a record of your sales, keeping it private just for family and friends, announce shows, discounts on RB etc. (although the latter might work best in special announcements)

One revolutionary piece of advice, well for me anyway, Davey gives, is to ditch the business card…he calls them “20th Century appendages. They are a classic way for someone to blow you off. Stop using them”. Never provide any material that does not have a call to action.
Instead he says use postcards, sale sheets or brochures with a reason to contact you. It could be for commission work, or for free shipping, free local delivery and hanging, a special price or discounted framing.
I can see where he’s coming from…I have really nice business cards…they are miniatures of my paintings and people snatch them out of my hands like bread to the hungry, gleefully going through the pile and walking away with fistfuls…once the supply I have are used up I won’t create anymore quite like them
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His last piece of advice is to never rely on prospects to call you…get a commitment from them as to when you can call, keep the promise and send thank you notes with reminders after the meeting…if you can’t do these routine marketing tasks, get someone to do them for you

“Most often the difference in wealth between two equally talented artists is one runs circles around the other when it comes to marketing and selling. Do not let fear, misperceptions or inaction sabotage your future

Marketing at the local level is very important…letting the people around you, in your neighbourhood and local services helps you to build confidence in your marketing skills and as Davey says make "ardent and long-lived fans" Janis…Source B Davey Art Print

Do you market at your local level? how did you go about it and what level of success have you had?
My Ipad has been invaluable in showing my RB portfolio to people in my neighbourhood, are you using your Iphone or Ipad in the same way?

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