Some helpful tips to attract more buyers to your gallery....

Signing up with a big, well-known art website (like this one) to help sell your art online is usually pretty easy and sometimes even free. But after a few months with no sales many of you will begin to ask one very important question:

  • “How can I get buyers to find my art online?”

You see, unlike the sign-up process, the whole art selling thing is definitely NOT a piece of cake. So instead of just waiting and hoping art collectors will find you, here are a few ways that you can start directing potential buyers to your artwork right now.

  • Write better artwork descriptions.

The best websites for selling your art will allow and even encourage you to write full descriptions for each artwork you upload, as well as a bio and artist statement.

With a little effort you can make your descriptions chock full of words that art buyers might be searching for..

  • Be more social.

Depending on the art website you signed up with, your use of keywords in descriptions may help a lot or not at all. One thing that’s almost sure to bring in traffic, however, is social networking. Here are some of the best ways to network and sell your art.

Facebook – Since you can now join Facebook based on location, it is a great social networking site for local artists….. you can create groups and add contacts, but you can also create events (art shows, perhaps?) and issue invitations with RSVP ability built in.

Plus, if you’d like to advertise your art to a very specific group of people, Facebook now let’s you do that.

YouTube – This might be a little tech-heavy for some artists, but it’s too big to ignore. If you have to, find a friend who posts videos regularly and enlist their help. Make a quick art demonstration or an artwork-in-progress video, and upload it to your own “channel.” Then just find a way to link directly from that page to your artwork.

Twitter…Twitter is invaluable in letting a large number of people know in an instant when you have new works to post, but you should also post helpful information on a regular basis as well.

Forums – Any forum is great for networking, not just art forums. And while you’re there, always put a link to your artwork in the signature line of your posts. You might even consider joining some forums that have the same interests as you. Do you paint flowers? Join a botany forum. Horses? Find an equestrian group. If you plan on spamming people though, prepare to be banned. Only join forums that you’d enjoy whether you sold any art or not.

The thing to realize with social networking sites is that you have to be willing to spend time talking, commenting, and getting involved. (important that you do that right here on RB too)..
If you can do that, you’ll start to see some results. If you have fun in the meantime, that’s even better
.

  • Create an email newsletter for your fans.

Let people know they can get an email update whenever you finish another piece, and work on building long-term relationships with them through that periodic contact. If you’re already posting artwork on a blog it’s pretty easy to send emails automatically.

  • Advertise your art website (in print).

When you’re printing business cards, postcards, flyers, or anything else, include the main website address where people can find and buy your art.

Don’t be shy about promoting your website offline at all—in fact, it’s probably the surest way you can target your artwork to people that you know would want to buy your art.

  • Team up with other artists.

Find a few other artists and join forces. You could create a group blog or just commit to linking back and forth; either way everybody benefits

  • Stick to it for at least 6 months.

This whole process isn’t necessarily easy, but it will work over time. Don’t get disappointed in a week or a month when nothing seems to have changed. After six months, take a look back.

Excerpted from the Empty Easel Art Advice website

Journal Comments

  • W. H. Dietrich
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