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Journal

Can You Tell Good Work From Bad?

It is important that artists learn how to tell good work from bad, especially when the work is their own..if you are interested in selling your work, or possibly getting a gallery show, the quality of the work you display is very important..
In addition, you must be able to feel proud of what you’ve created…how often have I heard people say that they’re surprised when someone buys their work…if you have no confidence in what you create, if you are tentative or deprecating, it comes through loud and clear
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Can you tell good work from bad? do you post all your work in hopes that someone might buy it even though you might be unsure whether the work is good or not?

Letting Go...

Quote: And did you ever note how knowledge holds up flow? What we know how to do and have come to depend upon can, in an innocent wander, turn adventure to boredom.
Sure, professionalism requires professional knowledge: order, theory, technique, facility. The miracle is that knowledge gives its best confidence when kept quietly in a secondary pocket. Only then comes the undisputed magic of letting go. I’m not sure about everybody but it seems what we want more than anything in our work are passages, even minor moments, of con brio
Robert Genn

When it comes to art letting go is so important it requires an entire post to itself…following the previous discussion about painting within the lines, the idea of letting go falls right into place..

Do you find you have difficulty forgetting w

The Tyranny of Drawing..

Quote: “Did you ever stop to realize how drawing holds up brushwork? When work is prepared with a drawing, simple or complex, there’s the tendency to work around the lines and cave in to the drawing.
This can be an effective way to go, of course, but for a lot of us drawing is a tyranny which impedes freshness and spontaneity.
The virus of overwork easily eats away if there are lines to attend to…Drawing, while often a vital step, ought to be implied or suggested with paucity. Brushstrokes then take on a look, a beauty of their own, and the subject finds itself in the strokes
…Robert Genn

When it comes to creating most of my paintings, I almost never draw as I find it holds me up, restricts the painting and makes it tight…with the exception of my hyperreal collecti

Blank Brains...

“I have cycles, though it took me a long time realize that and even longer to understand how they worked. There are periods of painting that seems successful beyond my capabilities. When one painting leads to another which leads to another, and I can do no wrong. When inspiration walks with me, when even the simplest things have deep meaning.
Then there are periods of just work. That’s when I wonder why I bother, what makes me think I can paint and do it within a reasonable level of ability. That’s when it seems no matter what I do, well to be blunt, stinks.
Andrew a Wyeth called it ‘Blank brains’.” …Mark Brockman
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Do you ever suffer from "blank brains"?

My Art Reviewed....

I got a wonderful review of my art on the Empty Easel blog…
The writer approached me some time ago and asked me to send her some images that she chose from my portfolio…she explained that she was thrilled with my work and was going to write about it..
Initially I deleted the email, (she was a total stranger), but luckily she was persistent and after some fact checking I capitulated and sent her the three she wanted to review.
It’s a wonderful article and I am really pleased…just in time for Christmas too…What a gift

READ THE REVIEW HERE

Is It The Job of The Artist to Influence Society?

“If either art or society is to survive the coming half-century, it will be necessary for us to re-assess our values. The time is past due for us to decide whether we are a moral people, or merely a comfortable people, whether we place the sanctity of enterprise above the debasement of our public.
If it falls to the lot of artists and poets to ask these questions then the more honorable their role. It is not the survival of art alone that is at issue, but the survival of the free individual and a civilized society.”

Ben Shahn 1951—lecture from Pohl, Frances K., In the Eye of the Storm, an Art Conscience, 1930-1970. Selections from the Collection of Phillip J. and Suzanne Shiller, 1995, Chameleon Books, Inc.

Joseph Leboit “Tranquility”
In his etching above Leboit comments on

A Question of Commitment...

Success in any endeavour requires commitment and no less so in an art career..
Not just improving skills by taking courses, acquiring the best materials, and practicing daily, but taking it a lot further and commit to fully expressing our art…
It’s not enough to sit and dream about a masterpiece, to envision or imagine a gallery and a solo show, but to understand that to do well, we have to go many steps further.
By that I mean staying true to yourself and your own ideas…forget about how others interpret the world…your single view is all that you need to flourish
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It’s important to believe that we can do as well as others, however we must also keep in mind that the most successful people have devoted immense amounts of time, energy and dedication to achieving t

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