The 5.5 was one of the best guns ever produced by the British Army. It began to reach troops in 1941 and by the end of 1942 was serving on both fronts of the desert war; by the end of the Second World War it had served in every major battle area with both Commonwealth and British forces. Required a crew of nine and a large tractor for movement, ammunition and crew.
Max range (with 82lb. HE shell) was 18,200 yards.

Camera: Olyumpus SP-570UZ

Comments

  • Woodie
    Woodiealmost 6 years ago

    Another great shot!

  • Thanks Neil – Ted

    – Edward Denyer

  • David Smith
    David Smithalmost 6 years ago

    Good one Ted i hope they have removed the firing pin

  • I don’t know it looked brand new!! – Thanks for the comment.

    – Edward Denyer

  • coffeetea
    coffeeteaalmost 6 years ago

    this is a rare view! thanks for making such a great photo to see . fine angle.

  • Thanks for the comment – Glad you like it – Ted

    – Edward Denyer

  • taratrade
    taratradealmost 6 years ago

    Hello Ted
    Thank you for my Christmas present. My wife bought me wonderfull memories of my time in the the 10th Medium Regiment, Geelong, Australia with your work. Magnificent picture of a magnificent Field Piece. Graeme Wood, TARA, Queensland, Australia.

  • So glad you liked it Graeme – Happy Christmas – Ted

    – Edward Denyer

  • taratrade
    taratradealmost 6 years ago

    Hello Ted
    Thanks for the Christmas wishes. Hope you have a very productive and prosperous New Year. Look for a sale of the spitfire image in the next couple of days. Regards Graeme and Pam Wood.

  • Thanks again for your good wishes and comment. All the best for the New Year to you. – Ted

    – Edward Denyer

  • Mike Jeffries
    Mike Jeffriesabout 5 years ago

    Lovely shot of a classic weapon, we had these in the first regiment I served with, the 21 Medium, Royal Artillery. I was in 7 Battery and a Gunner before being made a driver and as I remember crewed the gun with just six men, a gun layer, then a guy who opened and closed the breech and also fired the gun with a lanyard, two loaders for the shell cradle and ramming one of whom also loaded the charge in a canvas bag while the other would wash out the breech with the wet rammer after each shot to get rid of any embers , and two guys who fused the shells and brought up ammo from the tractor, ie. the Matador which had to be parked about 20 yards or so back after un-hitching.

  • Great to hear that you have used bothe the Matadoe and the 5.5 Mike. Thanks for the comment. – Ted

    – Edward Denyer

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