Inspired by the legend of Saint George and the Dragon

“The episode of St George and the Dragon was a legend brought back with the Crusaders and retold with the courtly appurtenances belonging to the genre of Romance. The earliest known depiction of the legend is from early eleventh-century Cappadocia, (in the iconography of the Eastern Orthodox Church, George had been depicted as a soldier since at least the seventh century); the earliest known surviving narrative text is an eleventh-century Georgian text.

In the fully developed Western version, which developed as part of the Golden Legend, a dragon or Crocodile makes its nest at the spring that provides water for the city of “Silene” (perhaps modern Cyrene) in Libya or the city of Lydda, depending on the source. Consequently, the citizens have to dislodge the dragon from its nest for a time, to collect water. To do so, each day they offer the dragon at first a sheep, and if no sheep can be found, then a maiden must go instead of the sheep. The victim is chosen by drawing lots. One day, this happens to be the princess. The monarch begs for her life to be spared, but to no avail. She is offered to the dragon, but there appears Saint George on his travels. He faces the dragon, protects himself with the sign of the cross, slays the dragon, and rescues the princess. The grateful citizens abandon their ancestral paganism and convert to Christianity.

The dragon motif was first combined with the standardised Passio Georgii in Vincent of Beauvais’ encyclopedic Speculum historale and then in Jacobus de Voragine, Golden Legend, which guaranteed its popularity in the later Middle Ages as a literary and pictorial subject.

The parallels with Perseus and Andromeda are inescapable. In the allegorical reading, the dragon embodies a suppressed pagan cult. The story has other roots that predate Christianity. Examples such as Sabazios, the sky father, who was usually depicted riding on horseback, and Zeus’s defeat of Typhon the Titan in Greek mythology, along with examples from Germanic and Vedic traditions, have led a number of historians, such as Loomis, to suggest that George is a Christianized version of older deities in Indo-European culture.

In the medieval romances, the lance with which St George slew the dragon was called Ascalon, named after the city of Ashkelon in Israel."
From wikipedia

Comments

  • Nikella
    Nikellaabout 4 years ago

    This is wonderful! I can see this in a children’s book…I love illustrations that portray another era!

  • Gal Lo Leggio
    Gal Lo Leggioabout 4 years ago

    Thank you very much. xx

  • artisandelimage
    artisandelimageabout 4 years ago

  • landylachs
    landylachsabout 4 years ago

    Very lovely textures!

  • thank you =)

    – Gal Lo Leggio

  • Deborah Lazarus
    Deborah Lazarusover 3 years ago

    All of your mythological pieces such as this one needs to be in my Original Entities group. The same would go for your supernatural beings. When in doubt, submit it any way. I am flexible. I love your artistic style and flair. ☺

  • Thanks so much Deborah… i’ll be sure to post in your group often =)

    – Gal Lo Leggio

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