Old vs New - The Rocks - Sydney Cove

Photographic Prints

Size:
Finish:
$6.60
Neil Ross

Brisbane, Australia

Sizing Information

Small 12.0" x 7.3"
Medium 18.0" x 10.9"
Large 24.0" x 14.6"
X large 30.0" x 18.2"

Features

  • Superior quality silver halide prints
  • Archival quality Kodak Endura paper
  • Lustre: Professional photo paper with a fine grain pebble texture
  • Metallic: Glossy finish and metallic appearance to create images with exceptional visual interest and depth

Artist's Description

Photo taken with Canon IXUS 80 IS and edited with Lightzone. SIMPLICITY is my niche!
Alien Infrared with White Balance (temperature) shifts.

This photo was taken on my last trip to Sydney (2010), from the ferry approaching Circular Quay. It shows the general confusion of urban development where old meets new. The following information has been sourced from Wikipedia, and gives an insight into the history of this wonderful precinct of Sydney known as ‘The Rocks’. It was rescued from greedy developers and inept state governments who, looking for quick profits and easy solutions, earmarked the area for demolition. Fortunately, the united power of ordinary people saved the day… and The Rocks!

The Rocks became established shortly after the colony’s formation in 1788. The original buildings were made mostly of local sandstone, from which the area derives its name. From the earliest history of the settlement, the area had a reputation as a slum, often frequented by visiting sailors and prostitutes. During the late nineteenth century, the area was dominated by a gang known as the Rocks Push. It maintained this rough reputation until approximately the 1870s.

By the early 20th century, many of the area’s historic buildings were in serious decay. In 1900, bubonic plague broke out, and the state government resumed areas around The Rocks and Darling Harbour, with the intention of demolishing them and rebuilding them. More than 3800 houses, buildings and wharves were inspected and hundreds demolished, but the continuation of these plans were brought to a halt due to the outbreak of World War I. During the 1920s, several hundred buildings were demolished during the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. However, the outbreak of World War II once again stalled many of the redevelopment plans, and it was not until the 1960s that serious attempts to demolish much of the area were revived.

In 1968, the state government gave control of The Rocks to the Sydney Cove Redevelopment Authority, with the intention of demolishing all the original buildings, re-developing them as high-density residential dwellings. In February 1971, a group of local residents formed the Rocks Residents Group to oppose the plans. They felt that the new dwellings would result in increased rents, which would force out the traditional residents of the area. The residents’ group requested a Green ban from the Builder’s Labourers Federation, who had become increasingly active in preventing controversial developments over the previous four years.

By 1973, the union had imposed the ban, and after discussions with the Sydney Cove Redevelopment Authority, a ’People’s Plan’ was developed. By October 1973, it appeared that the redevelopment would proceed as originally planned, using non-union labour. For two weeks, demonstrations by local residents and unionists followed, with numerous arrests being made. Liberal Premier Robert Askin was in the midst of an election campaign, and used the protests as a means of conveying his law and order message to voters. However, the green ban stayed in place until 1975, when the state union leadership was overthrown, and was ultimately successful, as can be seen in the buildings that survive today. Instead of demolishing The Rocks, renovations transformed the area into a commercial and tourist precinct.

The Rocks area borders on the Bradfield Highway, leading to the Sydney Harbour Bridge, with the localities of Dawes Point and Millers Point, to the west. It is immediately adjacent to Circular Quay on Sydney Cove.

Directly opposite The Rocks on Sydney Cove is a building that is most definitely New (1973). This particular day, Sydney turned on it’s magnificent Autumn weather, so a ferry ride on the harbour was the order of the day.

Original Image:

Artwork Comments

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