Wildfower Macro series: Queen Anne's Lace , Part Two

Max Buchheit

OTTAWA, Canada

Artist's Description

A tight macro shot of Queen Anne’s Lace in the Fletcher Conservation area in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The site used to be a farm homestead.

Taken July, 2012 with a Fuji S9500, ISO 100, raw mode. Focal length 6.2mm (equiv to 28mm for 35mm film).

Name: Daucus Carota, a.k.a Queen Anne’s Lace, or Bird’s Nest or Wild Carrot

Here is a description from Andy’s Northern Ontario Wildflowers site:

Flower: White, flat-topped, umbel-shaped and lacy when fully open, may be central tiny purple floret, look like a bird’s nest when old, June to September.

Leaves: first year plants produce a leaf rosette on deep tap root; stiff, 3-forked bracts below main flower cluster; leaves finely divided and subdivided and appear lacy or fern-like.

Stem: Second year plant has a stem up to 1 m tall that is grooved and bristly.

Height: up to 1 m.

Habitat: Waste areas such as sides of roads, railroads, vacant lots.

Interest: At one time, it was fashionable for British ladies to wear the lacy green leaves of Queen Anne’s Lace for personal decoration. This may have been the origin of the name Queen Anne’s Lace. Other people suggest that the name originated because the flowers resemble delicate circles of lace. In late summer, the sides of the flower head curl inward and look like a bird’s nest; hence, the name Bird’s Nest. The plant is also closely related to the cultivated carrot and the root of Queen Anne’s lace smells like carrot; hence, the common name Wild Carrot.

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