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American Robin Fledgling (Turdus migratorius jr)

Mike Oxley

Cornwall Ontario, Canada

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American Robin Fledgling Turdus migratorius jr
Cooper Marsh, Lancaster, Ontario, Canada
June 3, 2011

Yet another beauty day in the GWN, sunny, a little cool (20 c – about 70 American) and a light breeze. A perfect day for visiting The Marsh! I arrived early afternoon, got the gear and headed out. There was a lot of damage from the Big Wind we had the other day – more trees in bits – but the wee birds were taking everything in stride. As I was walking down the trail to the boardwalk, I spotted this youngster in the lower branches of a bush. At that age, they think they’re invisible and just freeze, so I was able to get as close as the Bigma would allow. Meanwhile, Ma was enjoying some vintage sumac.

Cool Robin Facts – with thanks to www.allaboutbirds.org

An American Robin can produce three successful broods in one year. On average, though, only 40 percent of nests successfully produce young. Only 25 percent of those fledged young survive to November. From that point on, about half of the robins alive in any year will make it to the next. Despite the fact that a lucky robin can live to be 14 years old, the entire population turns over on average every six years.

Although robins are considered harbingers of spring, many American Robins spend the whole winter in their breeding range. But because they spend more time roosting in trees and less time in your yard, you’re much less likely to see them. The number of robins present in the northern parts of the range varies each year with the local conditions.

Robins eat a lot of fruit in fall and winter. When they eat honeysuckle berries exclusively, they sometimes become intoxicated.

Robin roosts can be huge, sometimes including a quarter-million birds during winter. In summer, females sleep at their nests and males gather at roosts. As young robins become independent, they join the males. Female adults go to the roosts only after they have finished nesting.

Robins eat different types of food depending on the time of day: more earthworms in the morning and more fruit later in the day. Because the robin forages largely on lawns, it is vulnerable to pesticide poisoning and can be an important indicator of chemical pollution.

The oldest recorded American Robin was 13 years and 11 months old.

Sony Alpha 700, Sigma 170 to 500 at 500 mm
iso 100, spot metered, F6.3, 1/60 second
Tripod

Artwork Comments

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