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The Nation - A Short Story by Yours Truly

Once upon a time, existed a man (whom we shall call Peter). The ultimate ambiguity of Peter’s character was certain; however, it has to be certain of one factor and that factor was ambition. Perhaps this Peter was of good will, or perhaps he was of more nefarious intentions. Was he of short stature, or maybe of a taller presence? Did people cringe with fear and loathing at his every arrival, yet fall into his powerful rhetoric? Did they, instead, praise this being as a savior, a hero? Alas, an enigmatic, suspenseful mystery among the finest!”

Peter, you see, was the first ever ruler of the first ever nation that was called Babylon.

“Here ye, here ye! I am your King, your ruler. My rule is official, it is sovereign, and it is absolute. I shall unite my subjects, and it will be good. I will install fear and patriotism into the very heart of my population. Babylon shall have a mighty army, worthy of the legions of the gods themselves! Finally, I and my advisers shall create and promote an economy that will set the very precedent and benchmark for all forthcoming nations to even attempt to assimilate with their little minds!”, wildly exclaimed Peter in a full and daunting voice.

Society in Babylon grew and prospered throughout the years. A well controlled, yet content society was firmly in place. The subjects-they respected their King and they held loyalty and trust in his will like the Earth depends upon the Sun. Tis’ when Peter’s mind grew bored and inattentive with his current nation. { Give a mouse a cookie, and he shall desire a cup of milk. } He then turns his attention beyond his land.

The King increasingly viewed the bordering nations that had sprout up as one would a fresh piece of savory meat. “My kingdom-much too diminutive for mine taste and that of my elite! The troops we shall rally! We must instill in their naive minds and hearts the virtues of fear, of loyalty, and bravery. Of the utmost priority, my legion shall be thirsty for blood. Thirsty to overthrow unworthy rulers and their assistants, whether legitimate they are or not. The kingdom of Babylon will expand to new heights one has never dared to dream of”, said Peter.

The dissipating of the Babylonian nation was all but palpable, while the rising of the Babylonian Empire was as readily obvious as the fox in the hen house. Lesser nations succumbed to the Crown-all at great expense and all with lesser leaders annihilated. Three-quarters a century past and the multitudes grew. However, as in the fall of the first nation and rise of the Empire, King Peter the Great grew quite weary. The armies were prepared for their destiny and the world stage set again. Only this time, virtue and fortune escaped the monarch. The King had lost with the will of his superior-the one and only superior. God had favored freedom and peace of man over the lust for oppressed millions. Thus, the Babylonian Empire (like the Roman Empire and Ottoman Empire later on) withered away like a dying bird in the hot sun and gave birth to better life for all but the wicked. The end.

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The Nation - A Short Story by Yours Truly by 


The rise and fall of the very first nation (fictional with an actual historic name)-Babylon, with Peter at the helm as King. Before the plot got too dark, I wanted to (even probably to the detriment of my plot overall) taper off that feeling of ruling oppression with a hint of light at the end of the tunnel. Hope you enjoyed!

Tags

god, peter, king, nations, babylon, kingdoms, romans, fictional history

Comments

  • Rhinovangogh
    Rhinovangoghover 4 years ago

    Well done. The tale is the same. A March of Folly (Tuchman) to the end of the end. Cheers, J

  • Thank you very much! All of this story more or less just came to my mind in 2 sittings!

    – MBach30

  • MBach30
    MBach30over 4 years ago

    Thank you! I haven’t heard of this other work you mention, where can I find it?

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