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Morwenna, born around 480, was one of the many holy daughters of King Brychan Brycheiniog.
She was trained in Ireland before becoming one of the Welsh saints who crossed over to Cornwall. Morwenna made her home in a little hermitage at Hennacliff (the Raven’s Crag), afterwards called Morwenstow. It stands near the top of a high cliff looking over the Atlantic, where the sea is almost constantly stormy, and from where, in certain atmospheric conditions, the coast of Wales can be seen. She built a church there, for the local people, with her own hands. She carried the stone, on her head, from beneath the cliff and where she once stopped for a rest, a spring gushed forth. It can still be seen to the west of the church.

When she was dying, her brother, St. Nectan, came to see her from Hartland and she bade him raise her up that she might look once more on her native shore. This occurred some time in the early 6th century, possibly on 24th July.

From Early British Kingdoms

Watercolours pencils on 24×32 cm watercolour paper (260g/m²)

Tags

portrait, woman, church, female, christianity, religion, st, wales, ireland, holy, catholic, saint, christian, belief, welsh, mediaval, morwenna, 6th century

Comments

  • TriciaDanby
    TriciaDanbyabout 5 years ago

    ’Wonderfully done! :)

  • Thanks, my dear!

    – Rowan Lewgalon

  • DeborahDinah
    DeborahDinahabout 5 years ago

    Our yacht is called – Lady Morwenna – named after her. So great to ‘see’ the lady herself – super work.

  • Oooooh, this is gorgeous!
    How wonderful!

    – Rowan Lewgalon

  • joyousmoon
    joyousmoonabout 5 years ago

  • Ooooh, thanks a lot, Pamela!

    – Rowan Lewgalon

  • Alessandro Pinto
    Alessandro Pintoalmost 5 years ago

    wonderful…

  • Thanks very much!
    This means a lot to me.

    – Rowan Lewgalon

  • LifeDrawing
    LifeDrawingalmost 5 years ago

    Great pastel, soft eyes! even though coloured green there is a gentleness and then the fine drawing of the hands playing with the simple unadorned strap holding the cross. Lips!

  • Glad you like it. :)

    – Rowan Lewgalon

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