IN PORTRAIT THE BURCHELL’S ZEBRA – Equus burchelli – Bontkwagga by Magaret Meintjes
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IN PORTRAIT THE BURCHELL’S ZEBRA – Equus burchelli – Bontkwagga by 


Captured: The Kruger National Park, SOUTH AFRICA

Nikon D50
RAW (12-bit)
Lens: VR 80-400mm F/4.5-5.6 D
Focal Length: 300mm
Digital Vari-Program: Sports
Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern
1/80 sec – F/5.3
Sensitivity: ISO 200

BURCHELL’S ZEBRA – Equus burchelli – Bontkwagga
Several pattern features distinguish the Burchell’s zebra from the other zebra, the occurrence of “shadow” stripes between the heavy broad stripes on the hindquarters, the absence of the typical ‘grid-iron’ pattern on the top of the hindquarters and the lack of a dewlap.
The patterns on the animals vary considerably and the shadow stripes may be relatively heavy or even, rarely, absent together.
The males are recognised by their necks being thicker than those of the females.
Burchell’s zebra are diurnal animals favouring open woodland and savannah, but avoiding desert and forest. They are very dependent upon readily available water and cannot utilise even optimum grazing conditions if water is not available. They are often found in close association with blue wildebeest. It has been shown that their main predator, the lion has a preference for wildebeest and will take the wildebeest from a mixed herd, an association of distinct advantage for the zebra.
They are gregarious animals, existing in small family groups of rarely more than nine animals, comprising a stallion, with one or more mares and their foals.
Surplus males are ejected from the herd and form bachelor groups.
Their vocalisation is a warming double ‘ee-aa’ or ‘kwa-ha’, or a loud snort. A long snort indicates contentment, fighting male’s voice short sqeals and foals utter long squeals if afraid.
Defence is strong and take the form of kicking and biting. Foals are sometimes kicked to death by a stallion. They will stoutly defend the herd, ganging up on a predator. The zebra’s main enemies are lion and they are also preyed upon by spotted hyaena and hunting dogs. The foals are food for leopards and cheetah.
The Hartmann’s zebra is preyed upon by lions in the limited area where their ranges overlap. The foals are vulnerable to smaller predators, such as leopard and caracal. They produce one, rarely two, active young.
Predominantly grazers but will occasionally browse.
Gestation +/- 360 days
Mass 320kg

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Comments

  • Magaret Meintjes
    Magaret Meintjesabout 1 year ago


    BURCHELL’S ZEBRA – Equus burchelli – Bontkwagga
    Several pattern features distinguish the Burchell’s zebra from the other zebra, the occurrence of “shadow” stripes between the heavy broad stripes on the hindquarters, the absence of the typical ‘grid-iron’ pattern on the top of the hindquarters and the lack of a dewlap.
    The patterns on the animals vary considerably and the shadow stripes may be relatively heavy or even, rarely, absent together.
    The males are recognised by their necks being thicker than those of the females.
    Burchell’s zebra are diurnal animals favouring open woodland and savannah, but avoiding desert and forest. They are very dependent upon readily available water and cannot utilise even optimum grazing conditions if water is not available. They are often found in close association with blue wildebeest. It has been shown that their main predator, the lion has a preference for wildebeest and will take the wildebeest from a mixed herd, an association of distinct advantage for the zebra.
    They are gregarious animals, existing in small family groups of rarely more than nine animals, comprising a stallion, with one or more mares and their foals.
    Surplus males are ejected from the herd and form bachelor groups.
    Their vocalisation is a warming double ‘ee-aa’ or ‘kwa-ha’, or a loud snort. A long snort indicates contentment, fighting male’s voice short sqeals and foals utter long squeals if afraid.
    Defence is strong and take the form of kicking and biting. Foals are sometimes kicked to death by a stallion. They will stoutly defend the herd, ganging up on a predator. The zebra’s main enemies are lion and they are also preyed upon by spotted hyaena and hunting dogs. The foals are food for leopards and cheetah.
    The Hartmann’s zebra is preyed upon by lions in the limited area where their ranges overlap. The foals are vulnerable to smaller predators, such as leopard and caracal. They produce one, rarely two, active young.
    Predominantly grazers but will occasionally browse.
    Gestation +/- 360 days
    Mass 320kg

  • Larry Trupp
    Larry Truppabout 1 year ago

    Very nice capture

  • Magaret Meintjes
    Magaret Meintjesabout 1 year ago

    #1# per 24hrs 2013/09/30

  • Bruce Jones
    Bruce Jonesabout 1 year ago

    Awesome capture and great info!

  • Thanks so much Bruce!

    – Magaret Meintjes

  • Lynn Gedeon
    Lynn Gedeonabout 1 year ago

  • artisandelimage
    artisandelimageabout 1 year ago

  • Macky
    Mackyabout 1 year ago

  • Steve Randall
    Steve Randallabout 1 year ago

    Featured 30 Sep 2013

    Congratulations!!!

  • Thanks so much for a great honor Steve!

    – Magaret Meintjes

  • TeresaB
    TeresaBabout 1 year ago

    September 30, 2013

    Beautiful work!

  • Thank you so much for the honor Teresa!

    – Magaret Meintjes

  • TeresaB
    TeresaBabout 1 year ago

    September 30, 2013

    Beautiful work!

  • Thanks so very much Teresa!

    – Magaret Meintjes

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