Scarlette

loiteke

Joined September 2008

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Amira is belly dancer. I am dedicating this photo to her. On photo is actually Kersti Dennis, but I would like to call her Scarlett. All the world is calling her Amira
Kersti on this photo is like Scarlett in Gone with the Wind. While the studio and the public agreed that the part of Rhett Butler should go to Clark Gable (except for Clark Gable himself), casting for the role of Scarlett was a little harder. The search for an actress to play Scarlett in the film version of the novel famously drew the biggest names in the history of cinema, such as Bette Davis and Katharine Hepburn. The young English actress Vivien Leigh, virtually unknown in America, saw that several English actors, including Ronald Colman and Leslie Howard, were in consideration for the male leads in Gone with the Wind. Her agent happened to be the London representative of the Myron Selznick talent agency, headed by David Selznick’s brother, Myron. Leigh asked Myron to put her name into consideration as Scarlett on the eve of the American release of her recent picture. Gone with the Wind is a novel written by Margaret Mitchell, first published in 1936. The story is set in Clayton County, Georgia, and Atlanta during the American Civil War and Reconstruction era. It depicts the experiences of Scarlett O’Hara, the spoiled daughter of a well-to-do plantation owner, who must use every means at her disposal to come out of the poverty she finds herself in after Sherman’s March to the Sea. A historical novel, the story is a Bildungsroman or coming-of-age story, with the title taken from a poem written by Ernest Dowson.

Gone with the Wind was popular with American readers from the onset and was the top American fiction bestseller in the year it was published and in 1937. As of 2014, a Harris poll found it to be the second favorite book by American readers, just behind the Bible. More than 30 million copies have been printed worldwide.

Written from the perspective of the slaveholder, Gone with the Wind is Southern plantation fiction. Its portrayal of slavery and African Americans is controversial, as well as its use of a racial epithet and ethnic slurs. However, the novel has become a reference point for subsequent writers about the South, both black and white. Scholars at American universities refer to it in their writings, interpret and study it. The novel has been absorbed into American popular culture.

Margaret Mitchell was imaginative in the use of colour symbolism, especially the colours red and green, which surround Scarlett O’Hara. Mitchell identified the primary theme as survival. She left the ending speculative for the reader, however. She was often asked what became of her lovers, Rhett and Scarlett. She did not know, and said, “For all I know, Rhett may have found someone else who was less difficult.”2 Two sequels authorized by Mitchell’s estate were published more than a half century later. A parody was also produced.

Mitchell received the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for the book in 1937. It was adapted into a 1939 American film. The book is often read or misread through the film. Gone with the Wind is the only novel by Mitchell published during her lifetime.

Artwork Comments

  • Noel Elliot
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  • Delfino
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  • Brian Edworthy
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  • Al Bourassa
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  • Bunny Clarke
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  • Tarrby
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  • Carolyn Clark
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  • Susan Werby
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  • Deborah Lazarus
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  • vigor
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