Hetch Hetchy by Barbara  Brown
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“Dam Hetch Hetchy!”: John Muir Contests the Hetch-Hetchy Dam

The Progressive Era’s most controversial environmental issue was the 1908–1913 struggle over federal government approval for building the Hetch Hetchy dam in a remote corner of federally-owned land in California’s Yosemite National Park. The city of San Francisco, rebuilding after the devastating 1906 earthquake, believed the dam was necessary to meet its burgeoning needs for reliable supplies of water and electricity. At Congressional hearings on Hetch Hetchy held in 1913, supporters of the plan like Gifford Pinchot, the first Chief Forester of the United States and a noted environmentalist, argued that conservation of natural resources was best achieved through management of the wilderness. Preservationist and Sierra Club founder John Muir did not testify before Congress, but he argued against the Hetch Hetchy plan in this excerpt from his 1912 book, The Yosemite. In the end Congress chose management over aesthetics, voting 43–25 (with 29 abstentions) to allow the Hetch Hetchy dam on federal land.

Hetch Hetchy Valley, far from being a plain, common, rock-bound meadow, as many who have not seen it seem to suppose, is a grand landscape garden, one of Nature’s rarest and most precious mountain temples. As in Yosemite, the sublime rocks of its walls seem to glow with life, whether leaning back in repose or standing erect in thoughtful attitudes, giving welcome to storms and calms alike, their brows in the sky, their feet set in the groves and gay flowery meadows, while birds, bees, and butterflies help the river and waterfalls to stir all the air into music—things frail and fleeting and types of permanence meeting here and blending, just as they do in Yosemite, to draw her lovers into close and confiding communion with her.

Sad to say, this most precious and sublime feature of the Yosemite National Park, one of the greatest of all our natural resources for the uplifting joy and peace and health of the people, is in danger of being dammed and made into a reservoir to help supply San Francisco with water and light, thus flooding it from wall to wall and burying its gardens and groves one or two hundred feet deep. This grossly destructive commercial scheme has long been planned and urged (though water as pure and abundant can be got from sources outside of the people’s park, in a dozen different places), because of the comparative cheapness of the dam and of the territory which it is sought to divert from the great uses to which it was dedicated in the Act of 1890 establishing the Yosemite National Park.

The making of gardens and parks goes on with civilization all over the world, and they increase both in size and number as their value is recognized. Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where Nature may heal and cheer and give strength to body and soul alike. This natural beauty-hunger is made manifest in the little window-sill gardens of the poor, though perhaps only a geranium slip in a broken cup, as well as in the carefully tended rose and lily gardens of the rich, the thousands of spacious city parks and botanical gardens, and in our magnificent National parks—the Yellowstone, Yosemite, Sequoia, etc.—Nature’s sublime wonderlands, the admiration and joy of the world. Nevertheless, like anything else worthwhile, from the very beginning, however well guarded, they have always been subject to attack by despoiling gain-seekers and mischief-makers of every degree from Satan to Senators, eagerly trying to make everything immediately and selfishly commercial, with schemes disguised in smug-smiling philanthropy, industriously, shampiously crying, “Conservation, conservation, panutilization,” that man and beast may be fed and the dear Nation made great. Thus long ago a few enterprising merchants utilized the Jerusalem temple as a place of business instead of a place of prayer, changing money, buying and selling cattle and sheep and doves; and earlier still; the first forest reservation, including only one tree, was likewise despoiled. Ever since the establishment of the Yosemite National Park, strife has been going on around its borders and I suppose this will go on as part of the universal battle between right and wrong, however much its boundaries may be shorn, or its wild beauty destroyed. . . .

That anyone would try to destroy [Hetch Hetchy Valley] seems; incredible; but sad experience shows that there are people good enough and bad enough for anything. The proponents of the dam scheme bring forward a lot of bad arguments to prove that the only righteous thing to do with the people’s parks is to destroy them bit by bit as they are able. Their arguments are curiously like those of the devil, devised for the destruction of the first garden. . . .

These temple destroyers, devotees of ravaging commercialism, seem to have a perfect contempt for Nature, and, instead of lifting their eyes to the God of the mountains, lift them to the Almighty Dollar.

Dam Hetch Hetchy! As well dam for water-tanks the people’s cathedrals and churches, for no holier temple has ever been consecrated by the heart of man.

Source: John Muir, The Yosemite (New York: Century, 1912), 255–257, 260–262. Reprinted in Roderick Nash, The American Environment: Readings in The History of Conservation (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1968).
The name is derived from the Miwok Indian word hatchhatchie meaning “edible grasses” Native Americans lived on this land centuries before the first white man, searching for gold entered this valley.
There is now a great movement to drain the reservoir and restore the Hetch Hetchy Valley.
Before the dam.

Barbara Brown is a mental health professional and an avid photographer. She lives in northern California and enjoys nature and all types of photography.

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Comments

  • PSL1
    PSL1over 3 years ago

    wow…This is a superb composition Barbara.

  • Thank you so much Peter!

    – Barbara Brown

  • Glenn Cecero
    Glenn Ceceroover 3 years ago

    Stunningly beautiful!

  • Thank you so much Glenn!!

    – Barbara Brown

  • EarthGipsy
    EarthGipsyover 3 years ago

    Beautifully composed. Looks like a great place for and walk and a swim.

  • Thank you! Unfortunately, the only thing one can do is hike. No boating or swimming here!

    – Barbara Brown

  • paintingsheep
    paintingsheepover 3 years ago

    Very wonderful place and capture!

  • Thank you so much Gena!

    – Barbara Brown

  • AkaleiKilikina
    AkaleiKilikinaover 3 years ago

    This is so beautiful! Looks like such a relaxing place!

  • Thank you so much! it is a beautiful place.

    – Barbara Brown

  • Heloisa Castro
    Heloisa Castroover 3 years ago

    great capture

  • Thank you so much Heloisa!

    – Barbara Brown

  • Matsumoto
    Matsumotoover 3 years ago

    Great read. Fantastic image. :)

  • Thank you so much!

    – Barbara Brown

  • Debbie Robbins
    Debbie Robbinsover 3 years ago

    Wonderful!!!! :))x

  • Thank you so much Debbie!

    – Barbara Brown

  • Turi Caggegi
    Turi Caggegiabout 3 years ago

    Wonderful shot!


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