Canadian whisky dominance, and in particular Seagram’s, can be attributed to prohibition. During this infamous dry period in US history, Canadian whisky literally poured down the hill into America’s illicit speakeasies.

After prohibition was abolished in 1933, the Federal Alcohol Administration allocated the importation of 3,314,443 gallons of whisky (we’re guessing for medicinal purposes). Most of this came from Canada.

The most popular brands of Canadian whisky, Crown Royal, Seagram’s V.O. and C.C. and are called for in bars all over the world. For beginning whisky drinkers, these are the lightest and easiest whiskies to swallow.

All Canadian whisky must be aged in oak casks for a minimum of three years, although most spend from six to eight years in the barrel. After aging, the whisky is dumped into huge blending vats. This is the stage at which the art of the blender is put to the test. One of the many tricks of the blender’s trade is the use of whiskies of various ages in order to produce a consistent blend from year to year (the bottle label can only carry the age statement of the youngest spirit used). That’s why a bottle of Canadian whisky produced today is likely to have the same taste profile as a bottle of the same brand purchased 10, 20 or more years ago.

After blending, the whisky is returned to barrels to allow the newly combined whiskies to marry. Only then is it bottled and sold. As a rule, Canadian whiskies are light-bodied, slightly pale and have a reputation for being mellow. What many people, even in the business, don’t realize is how big the Canadian category is. Accounting for 11.5% of all distilled spirits consumption, Canadian whisky trails only vodka in terms of its share of the market.

Crown Royal Special Reserve Whisky. Years ago, the Crown Royal Master Blender had the remarkable foresight to set aside a limited amount of the world’s most select whiskies. He marked the casks: To Be Opened Under Orders of the Master Blender Only. Years later, the Master Blender issued those orders. Premium enough to be deemed crown royal whiskey and distinctive enough to be called Special Reserve, Crown Royal Special Reserve is a blend of unparalleled lineage, an extraordinary find. Rich, mellow, woody, full-bodied and smooth.A blend of the finest Canadian whiskies. The whiskies selected for Crown Royal are always the smoothest and mellowest. Fully matured in specially selected oak casks, it is a perfect balance of smoothness and strength.
Crown Royal can be enjoyed straight up or on the rocks. Of course it’s just as enjoyable when mixed in the popular Crown & Cola, or in a classic, like the Royal Manhattan.

The most popular brands of Canadian whiskey, Crown Royal, Seagram’s V.O. and C.C. and are called for in bars all over the world.
Whisky.com

Fuji FinePix S5000

Taken: May 1 2009 – Waterloo, Ontario

Tags

history, waterloo, ontario, canada

Comments

  • Tracy Faught
    Tracy Faughtover 3 years ago

    My goodness!! I love Crown Royal!! lol!! Nice shot Jules!! :O]

  • Thank you Tracy for your favour, this has been a landmark for some time but has been dismantled because of construction…Jules

    – jules572

  • sarnia2
    sarnia2over 3 years ago

  • Thank you Sarina…Jules

    – jules572

  • Leslie van de Ligt
    Leslie van de ...over 3 years ago

    What a great shot and a marvelous write. Wow. I’ve always appreciated Crown Royal and stocked it in the liquor cabinet for drinks. Now I will be able to share it’s lineage as well. :>)) Leslie

  • Thank you Leslie, a fine choose for any party…Jules :-)))

    – jules572

  • Mike Oxley
    Mike Oxleyover 3 years ago

    A great find and capture, Jules! A very interesting and informative read, too. It’s a shame it’s been dismantled.

  • Thank you Mike, I used to love to collect the purple bags the this whisky came in, used the bags to store my marbles in :-))) in the good ole`days…Jules

    – jules572

  • Declan Carr
    Declan Carrover 3 years ago

    distilled whiskey from rye best drink going drink it neat.I see you spell your whisky like a true Scot without the (e) wonderful capture. any chance of sending one adrift of Nova Scotia with a message saying for decie in Ireland.

  • Thank you Declan, would it arrive any faster if I sent it via air, by way of Canada Goose :-)))…Jules

    – jules572

  • CeePhotoArt
    CeePhotoArtover 3 years ago

    Congratulations!!! You have been featured in Cee’s Fun Artsy Friends Group

  • Thank you Cee for the feature, these barrels have been a landmark for some time but have been dismantled for construction…Jules

    – jules572

  • peechez2010
    peechez2010over 3 years ago

    This is a fabulous perspective shot and I love the subject…bravo! Peechez

  • Thank you Peechez, there were 800 barrels in this pyramid…Jules

    – jules572

  • peechez2010
    peechez2010over 3 years ago

    800….oh my gosh…how tall was it?

  • Put it this way I wasn’t crawling to the top. :-))

    – jules572

  • Brian Dodd
    Brian Doddover 3 years ago

    Awesome Capture!!

  • Thank you Brian…Jules

    – jules572

  • sundawg7
    sundawg7over 3 years ago

    Looks like you had “barrels of fun” at this spot Julie. LOL Terrific capture and great angle. Congratulations on the deserving feature. XO, Ron

  • The you Ron, the pyramid id gone and the barrels were given to who ever wanted them, only a few good were saved for a future art piece…Jules

    – jules572

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