Snowdrops

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Jon Lees

Downpatrick, United Kingdom

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Snowdrop)
Galanthus
Common Snowdrop
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Tribe: Galantheae
Genus: Galanthus
L.
Species

G. alpinus
G. angustifolius
G. cilicicus
G. fosteri
G. elwesii
G. gracilis
G. ikariae
G. koenenianus
G. krasnovii
G. lagodechianus
G. nivalis
G. peshmenii
G. platyphyllus
G. plicatus
G. reginae-olgae
G. rizehensis
G. transcaucasicus
G. trojanus
G. woronowii

Galanthus is a small genus of about 20 species in the family Amaryllidaceae commonly known as Snowdrops. Most flower in winter, before the Spring Equinox (21st March in the Northern Hemisphere) but certain species flower in late autumn and early spring.

Snowdrops are sometimes confused with their relatives, snowflakes, which are Leucojum and Acis species; see below.

Galanthus nivalis is the best-known and most widespread representative of the genus Galanthus. It is native to a large area of Europe, stretching from the Pyrenees in the west, through France and Germany to Poland in the north, Italy, Northern Greece and European Turkey. It has been introduced and is widely naturalised elsewhere 1. Although it is often thought of as a British native wild flower, or to have been brought to the British Isles by the Romans, it was probably introduced around the early sixteenth century.2

Most other Galanthus species are from the eastern Mediterranean, though several are found in South Russia, Georgia and Azerbaijan.3 Galanthus fosteri comes from Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey and maybe Israel.4
[edit] Conservation

Some snowdrop species are threatened in their wild habitats, and in most countries it is now illegal to collect bulbs from the wild. Under CITES regulations, international trade in any quantity of Galanthus, whether bulbs, live plants or even dead ones, is illegal without a CITES permit. This applies to hybrids and named cultivars as well as species. CITES does, however, allow a limited trade in wild-collected bulbs of just three species (G. nivalis, G, elwesii and G. woronowii) from Turkey and Georgia.5
[edit] Description
Common snowdrop

All species of Galanthus are perennial, herbaceous plants which grow from bulbs. Each bulb generally produces just two or three linear leaves and an erect, leafless scape (flowering stalk), which bears at the top a pair of bract-like spathe valves joined by a papery membrane. From between them emerges a solitary, pendulous, bell-shaped white flower, held on a slender pedicel. The flower has no petals: it consists of six tepals, the outer three being larger and more convex than the inner series. The six anthers open by pores or short slits. The ovary is three-celled, ripening into a three-celled capsule. Each whitish seed has a small, fleshy tail (elaiosome) containing substances attractive to ants which distribute the seeds.6 The leaves die back a few weeks after the flowers have faded.

The inner flower segments are usually marked with a green, or greenish-yellow, bridge-shaped mark over the small “sinus” (notch) at the tip of each tepal.

An important feature which helps to distinguish between species (and to help to determine the parentage of hybrids) is their “vernation” (the arrangement of the emerging leaves relative to each other). This can be “applanate”, “supervolute” or “explicative”. In applanate vernation the two leaf blades are pressed flat to each other within the bud and as they emerge; explicative leaves are also pressed flat against each other, but the edges of the leaves are folded back or sometimes rolled; in supervolute plants one leaf is tightly clasped around the other within the bud and generally remains at the point where the leaves emerge from the soil.7
[edit] Notable species

  • Common snowdrop, Galanthus nivalis, grows to around 7–15 cm tall, flowering between January and April in the northern temperate zone (January–May in the wild). Applanate vernation8
  • Crimean snowdrop, Galanthus plicatus, 30 cm tall, flowering January/March, white flowers, with broad leaves folded back at the edges (explicative vernation)
  • Giant snowdrop, Galanthus elwesii, a native of the Levant, 23 cm tall, flowering January/February, with large flowers, the three inner segments of which often have a much larger and more conspicuous green blotch (or blotches) than the more common kinds; supervolute vernation
  • Galanthus reginae-olgae, from Greece and Sicily, is quite similar in appearance to G. nivalis, but flowers in autumn before the leaves appear. The leaves, which appear in the spring, have a characteristic white stripe on their upper side; applanate vernation
    o subsp. vernalis, from Sicily, northern Greece and the south of former Yugoslavia, blooms at the end of the winter with developed young leaves and is thus easily confused with G. nivalis.

Galanthus reginae-olgae
flowers in the fall

Galanthus reginae-olgae
leaves in the winter
[edit] Cultivars

There are numerous single- and double-flowered cultivars of Galanthus nivalis, and also of several other Galanthus species, particularly G. plicatus and G. elwesii. There are also many hybrids between these and other species (there are more than 500 cultivars described in Bishop, Davis & Grimshaw’s book, plus lists of many cultivars that have now been lost, and others not seen by the authors). They differ particularly in the size, shape and markings of the flower, the period of flowering, and other characteristics, mainly of interest to the keen (even fanatical) snowdrop collectors, known as “galanthophiles”, who hold meetings where the scarcer cultivars change hands.9 Double-flowered cultivars and forms, such as the extremely common Galanthus nivalis f. pleniflorus ‘Flore Pleno’, may be less attractive to some people but they can have greater visual impact in a garden setting.
[edit] Propagation

Propagation is by offset bulbs, either by careful division of clumps in full growth (“in the green”), or removed when the plants are dormant, immediately after the leaves have withered; or by seeds sown either when ripe, or in spring. Professional growers and keen amateurs also use such methods as “twin-scaling” to increase the stock of choice cultivars quickly.
[edit] Similar genera

Snowdrops are sometimes confused with their relatives, snowflakes, Leucojum and Acis species. Leucojums are much larger and flower in spring (or early summer, depending on the species), with all six tepals in the flower being the same size, though it should be noted that some “poculiform” (goblet- or cup-shaped) Galanthus can have inner segments similar in shape and length to the outer ones.
[edit] Active substances

It was suggested by Duvoisin in 1983 that the mysterious magical herb moly that appears in Homer’s Odyssey is actually snowdrop. An active substance in snowdrop is called galantamine, which, as anticholinesterase, could have acted as an antidote to Circe’s poisons.10 Galantamine (or galanthamine) can be helpful in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, though it is not a cure; the substance also occurs naturally in daffodils and other narcissi.

Artwork Comments

  • Priska Wettstein
  • Jon Lees
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