Meet the A-Line Dress. All about all-over printing.

Sugary Addicted

He danced around the room, singing “Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker. “ He surely did know, for only four years later he died from alcohol poisoning.
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I lived for ten years of my life without being allowed to eat candy. I had it at school and Valentine’s Day when we all dropped the secret notes and candy into each other’s boxes. That was my favorite time of the year, because I loved candy but I was denied it at home. My mom thought she had diabetes, so we could only eat sugar-free candy, which I found to be disgusting. When my mom switched doctors, she learned the other doctor had been an idiot. Candy was soon accessible everywhere in the house, and I haven’t stopped eating it since.
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Carrie, a high school friend, grew up addicted to candy. The first thing she was given when she could chew was a snickers bar. After that, all she ever wanted was candy. Once, when she was six, she sat in a pew at church and when she couldn’t stand it anymore, screamed at the top of her lungs, “Give me candy!” When the pastor looked at her and her mother quickly ushered her out of the room, all she could think was that the pastor reminded her of a huge chocolate bunny, like the kind you get at Easter, and she wanted to eat him.
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In the early 1900s, there was a man named George Smith who made a living selling candy on a stick. As his competition was fierce, he looked to find a marketing twist that would help his product stand out. One day, he took a break from work to visit the track. He placed a large amount of money on a certain horse and when it won, he named his candy “Lollipops” after the horse (Lolly Pop).
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Melissa sat at the table, watching all of us eat our lunch. When we asked her what she was going to eat, she told us she was going on a diet. It was her sixth or seventh; we had lost count a long time ago. Melissa’s diets were special. She wouldn’t eat any food for several days, sometimes longer than a week. When she felt she had starved herself enough, she would go and buy tons and tons of junk food -mostly candy as a celebration of lasting through another diet.
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There were six boxes of fun dip sitting on Kyle’s desk when I entered the room. “You bought more fun dip?” I asked with a look of confusion on my face. He had just bought four boxes the other day I was with him. As Kyle started to speak, I noticed his tongue was blue. Then, my eyes wandered over to the trash where it was completely filled with fun dip wrappers. I turned back, my eyes widened. “What?” he innocently asked, handing me one. Kyle had an addiction to fun dip that was obvious to everyone but himself. Eating from the upwards of five to ten packs a day, he was running out of money and wrecking his teeth. Later, when he wasn’t looking, I opened his candy drawer and saw that it was completely filled with fun dip.
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Ellie did not like candy. When people would ask her if she wanted a piece, she would shake her head, scrunch up her nose and say, “I don’t like candy.” It was as simple as that and there was no swaying her. One day, after Easter, I came back to the dorms with some candy I had gotten at fifty percent off. I dumped it into my candy jar and went on with my day. Several days later, Ellie stopped in my room to ask me a couple questions. While talking to me, her eyes swayed over to my candy jar and suddenly, she grabbed out a couple blue and pink boxes. “Can I have these?” she asked, her eyes dancing and a huge smile across her face. “I just love these!” I nodded, and she danced out of the room, as I chuckled that, for a girl who didn’t like candy, she had just sailed out of the room with boxes of the sugary Nerds.
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I once read a blog that boasted, “I have the secret to having the perfect child.” It’s simple, was written underneath. She then went on to say that the secret was really about motive, that you had to give your child the incentive to be an angel, all the time. “Just give them the promise that good behavior will earn your child a trip to the candy store.”
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Sam was sitting in my room, watching TV one day, and I noticed she had dipped her hand into my candy jar several times. I didn’t think anything of it until the end of the movie when I noticed the large amount of wrappers by her lap. This wasn’t the first time Sam had eaten a ton of candy without even realizing it. I watched her eyes look down at the pile of candy and widen. She shoved the candy jar away from her and threw all the wrappers away, as though they were contaminated. Turning to look at me, she pretended none of it had happened and proceeded to smile as she talked about the movie and what she didn’t like. We never talked about what had happened.
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A school district in Colorado suspended a six-year-old for drugs, according to the school’s zero-tolerance drug policy. What was this drug that the six-year-old possessed? Lemon drops. A teacher called an ambulance after seeing the little boy give some to his friend because it was a brand the teacher didn’t recognize. The lemon drops, however, turned out to be a very popular candy sold in the grocery store next to the school. The school officials didn’t care and told the mother that a child bringing candy to school is comparable to a teen who takes a gun to school. Perhaps it’s time to have a “zero-tolerance policy” toward idiotic school administrators.
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Sugary Addicted

johnsonKa21

Joined March 2008

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