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Limehouse Basin Panorama II

Canvas Prints

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$53.50
Get this by Dec 24
John Gaffen

London, United Kingdom

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Sizing Information

Small 12.0" x 5.3"
Medium 18.0" x 8.0"
Large 24.0" x 10.6"
X large 30.0" x 13.3"

Features

  • Each print is individually stretched and constructed for your order
  • Epson pigment inks using Giclée inkjets to ensure a long life
  • UV protection provided by a clear lacquer
  • Cotton/poly blend Canson canvas for brighter whites and even stretching

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Artist's Description

A second, photostiched, panorama of the historic Limehouse Basin, in Londons Docklands area.

The Limehouse Basin in Limehouse, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets provides a navigable link between the Regent’s Canal and the River Thames, through the Limehouse Basin Lock. A basin in the north of Mile End, near Victoria Park connects with the Hertford Union Canal leading to the River Lee Navigation. The dock originally covered an area of about 15 acres (60,703 m2). The Basin lies between the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) line and historic Narrow Street. Directly to the east is a small park, Ropemaker’s Fields

The Basin, built by the Regent’s Canal Company, was formerly known as Regent’s Canal Dock and was used by seagoing vessels and lighters to offload cargoes to canal barges, for onward transport along the Regent’s Canal. Although initially a commercial failure following its opening in 1820, by the mid 19th century the dock (and the canal) were an enormous commercial success for the importance in the supply of coal to the numerous gasworks and latterly electricity generating stations along the canal, and for domestic and commercial use. At one point it was the principal entrance from the Thames to the entire national canal network. Its use declined with the growth of the railways, although the revival of canal traffic during World War I and World War II gave it a brief swansong.

The redevelopment of the Basin started in 1983 as part of the London Docklands Development Corporation’s overall masterplan for the Docklands area. However, it took many years for the scheme to come to fruition. The property boom and bust of the 1980s set back progress considerably, as did the construction of the Limehouse Link tunnel which was built under the north side of the basin in the early 1990s. By early 2004 the majority of the once derelict land surrounding the basin had been developed into luxury flats.

Many homes around the Basin were built by Bellway Homes. The developments formed various phases. One of the first phases was Limehouse West consisting of 262 apartments: Medland House (2 buildings – blocks A1/A2 and A3), Berglen Court (3 buildings – blocks B1, B2/B3 and B4/B5) and the Pinnacle (1 building – block B6). Phase 4 consisted of three blocks of apartments and houses on the waterfront at the east end of the basin: Block D, a 12-storey apartment building (Pinnacle II); Block E, nine three-storey townhouses in two terraces of six and three houses; and Block F, a five-storey apartment building.

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