Southeastern United States considers Kudzu an invasive species. The vine coils and climbs, trails and travels, creeps and quickly covers everything! So here in the South, we sometimes call it Foot-a-night vine (among other things). It is a useful plant that can be used for basketry, making tea and I’ve even seen Kudzu brownies and jellies & jams. However, we can’t use ALL of it! There’s just too much Kudzu! It is taking over the world! We Southerners talk about Kudzu with a smile on our faces. I think it is a fun plant and only a few years ago discovered its pretty flower. Kudzu has an interesting history in Japan, its homeland, and an interesting future as well as researchers around the world continue to find more uses for it, even in medicine and perhaps in fuels.
The Amazing Story of Kudzu in The Southeastern States
© Jean Gregory Evans
Canon PowerShot SX20 IS f/5.7 1/400s ISO-125 100mm


Tags

flowers, flower, wildflower, pueraria lobata, kudzu, plant, invasive species, trailing vine, vine, foot a night vine, mile a minute vine, southeast usa, southeast, usa, jean gregory evans, fun, funny, interesting, mundane, fast, weird, odd, oddity

A lover of art and nature, Jean adores animals, whimsy, smiles, and chocolate chip cookies, not necessarily in that order.

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Comments

  • YouBet
    YouBetabout 3 years ago

    Very nice post but I so hate to see acres of trees covered by it.

  • Thank you, Linda. It is a frightfully fast plant and very successful. I have friends who left home for a couple of months and when returned, their car was almost completely disappeared under the green. It is like a horror movie, I think. :)

    – Jean Gregory Evans

  • Pamela Phelps
    Pamela Phelpsabout 3 years ago

    A beautiful plant, we also have some here in certain areas, but not like your experience! A fascinating article as well! Thanks for sharing!

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