Pina Bausch

I am a great admirer of the german choreographer Pina Bausch. She was born on july 27th 1940 in Solingen. She studied dance at Folkwang School in Essen from 1955 to 1958 and, after that, continued her study in the United States, where she was a special student of the Juilliard School of Music in New York.

Famous choreographies of Pina Bausch are Die sieben todsünden, Komm tanz mit mir, Café Müller, Bandeneon and Nur du.

I think my facination for modern dance has a lot to do with my passion for flying. And this passion for flying has everything to do with the desire to liberate myself from the restrictions of having a physical body. In my mind my possibility’s are unlimited, but in the physical world they aren’t. (Ask Leonardo Da Vinci.) If you look at classical or modern dance you can see this battle against the limitations of the physical world too. Dancers try to fly, but only succeed for a couple of seconds, untill gravity brings them back to earth.

Pina Bausch deals with this subject by emphesising the limitations. In her choreography ‘Café Müller’ the stage is completely filled up with chairs and tables. If a dancer was doing a solo the other dancers had the responsibility to protect them for colliding with a chair or a table and breaking their legs. So, they had to pull the tables and chairs away just a second before a collision happened. This was all part of the choreography. Unbelievable! In an other show of her a female dancer in a ballroom dress danced a solo and tried to dance through a wall. This didn’t succeed off course. While the show went on she stayed there, moving like an insect that tries to fly through a closed window.

In 2007 Pina Bausch recieved the Kyoto-Reward 2007. This is, next to the Nobel Price, one of the highest awards for Art and Science in the world .

If you want to read more about this great choreographer, visit her
website

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