Get 10% off instantly emailed gift certificates with code NOT2LATE

25 faves 4-1-2011
704 views 4-24-2012

Nikon P100

Featured in “Explore” 4-24-2012

Featured in “Dolls and Teddy Bears” 5-15-2011

4-8-2011

Featured “Still Life of the Week” The World As We See It, or as we missed it 3-29-2011

Editor’s Choice

Featured in “ART UNIVERSE” 3-28-2011

Permanent Feature Page

Featured in “Still Life Photography” 3-28-2011

Featured in “Cee’s Fun Artsy Friends” 3-27-2011

Featured in “Quality Layered Work + HDR” 3-27-2011

Featured in “The World As We See It, or as we missed it” 3-25-2011

Pierrots always have been a favorite of mine. They are magical to me and I drift into a world of fantasy and magic!!!

Pierrot (French pronunciation: [pjεʁo]) is a stock character of pantomime and Commedia dell’Arte whose origins are in the late 17th-century Italian troupe of players performing in Paris and known as the Comédie-Italienne; the name is a hypocorism of Pierre (Peter), via the suffix -ot. His character in postmodern popular culture—in poetry, fiction, the visual arts, as well as works for the stage, screen, and concert hall—is that of the sad clown, pining for love of Columbine, who usually breaks his heart and leaves him for Harlequin. Performing unmasked, with a whitened face, he wears a loose white blouse with large buttons and wide white pantaloons. Sometimes he appears with a frilled collaret and a hat, usually with a close-fitting crown and wide round brim, more rarely with a conical shape like a dunce’s cap. But most frequently, since his reincarnation under Jean-Gaspard Deburau, he wears neither collar nor hat, only a black skullcap. The defining characteristic of Pierrot is his naïveté: he is seen as a fool, always the butt of pranks, yet nonetheless trusting.
It was a generally buffoonish Pierrot that held the European stage for the first two centuries of his history. And yet early signs of a respectful, even sympathetic attitude toward the character appeared in the plays of Jean-François Regnard and in the paintings of Antoine Watteau, an attitude that would deepen in the 19th century, after the Romantics claimed the figure as their own. For Jules Janin and Théophile Gautier, Pierrot was not a fool but an avatar of the post-Revolutionary People, struggling, sometimes tragically, to secure a place in the bourgeois world. And subsequent artistic/cultural movements found him equally amenable to their cause: the Decadents turned him, like themselves, into a disillusioned disciple of Schopenhauer, a foe of Woman and of callow idealism; the Symbolists saw him as a lonely fellow-sufferer, crucified upon the rood of soulful sensitivity, his only friend the distant moon; the Modernists converted him into a Whistlerian subject for canvases devoted to form and color and line. In short, Pierrot became an alter-ego of the artist, specifically of the famously alienated artist of the 19th and early 20th centuries. His physical insularity; his poignant muteness, the legacy of the great mime Deburau; his white face and costume, suggesting not only innocence but the pallor of the dead; his eternal rejection by Columbine, coupled with his never-to-be vanquished unworldly naïveté—all conspired to lift him out of the circumscribed world of the Commedia dell’Arte and into the larger realm of myth. Much of that mythic quality still adheres to the “sad clown” of the postmodern era.

All Products

doll, drama, books, pierrot, clown, porcelain

I love the arts…nature…animals…
I find my peace while photographing
the beauty around me…
sunrises, sunsets, trees, flowers, animals,
the lake, architecture…
I also like to draw and back in the 80s, I loved all of the work by
Patrick Nagel, and I was doing drawings like his!!!

View Full Profile

Comments

  • Lissywitch
    Lissywitchalmost 4 years ago

    lovely work Dawn, I too have a pierot somewhere, although I have a suspicion the children have kidnapped him! lol

  • TY very much Lissy and for the fave…they are pretty…there’s something about them that just captures me!!! :o)

    – Dawn M. Becker

  • 1Nino
    1Ninoalmost 4 years ago

    Superb work young lady!!!!!!!……………..Tony

  • TY very much Tony :o)

    – Dawn M. Becker

  • Kathy Baccari
    Kathy Baccarialmost 4 years ago

  • TY much Kathy :o)

    – Dawn M. Becker

  • Linda  Makiej
    Linda Makiejalmost 4 years ago

    this is just GREAT!! lovely work…
    Have a happy weekend! :)

  • TY very much Linda and you too!!! :o)

    – Dawn M. Becker

  • GregTS
    GregTSalmost 4 years ago

    Beautiful! Fabulous image!! :)

  • TY very much Greg and for the fave :o)

    – Dawn M. Becker

  • paintingsheep
    paintingsheepalmost 4 years ago

    Wonderful capture…beautiful image!

  • TY very much Gena and for the fave :o)

    – Dawn M. Becker

  • Terrie Taylor
    Terrie Tayloralmost 4 years ago

    Beautiful capture and texture work. They do have a magic about them.

  • TY very much Terrie and for the fave :o)

    – Dawn M. Becker

  • George Lenz
    George Lenzalmost 4 years ago

    beautifully done. what a moving video too

  • TY very much George and for the fave… :o)

    – Dawn M. Becker

  • George Lenz
    George Lenzalmost 4 years ago

    p.s. once in a while artist’s post fantastic pieces like yours and include a story behind the art. This one is special in that way to me…..“Maybe next year”……

  • Awww…TY very much again! I try to post info on interesting images!!! :o)

    – Dawn M. Becker

  • JUSTART
    JUSTARTalmost 4 years ago

    lovely work

  • TY very much :o)

    – Dawn M. Becker

desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

10%off for joining

the Redbubble mailing list

Receive exclusive deals and awesome artist news and content right to your inbox. Free for your convenience.