Standing tall and pretty!!! ©

Framed Prints

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Dawn M. Becker

Milwaukee, United States

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Sizing Information

Small 12.0" x 7.7"
Medium 18.0" x 11.5"
Large 24.0" x 15.4"
Note: Image size. Matboard and frame increase size of final product


  • Custom-made box or flat frame styles
  • High-quality timber frame finishes to suit your decor
  • Premium Perspex - clearer and lighter than glass
  • Exhibition quality box or flat frame styles


Artist's Description

141 views 11-6-2011
Fuji FinePix S5000

Featured in “Grunge It Up” 4-12-2011

Permanent Feature Page

Featured in “The World As We See It, or as we missed it” 3-3-2011

To me all animals are beautiful and special. I can not imagine the world without them…it would be a very sad place!!! :o)
“I will cover you like a mother hen covers her chicks and protect you under my wings. Let My Word be your only weapon.” (Psalm 91:4)

The arcuate bill of the American Flamingo is well adapted to bottom scooping
Flamingos often stand on one leg, the other tucked beneath the body. The reason for this behavior is not fully understood. Some suggest that the flamingo, like some other animals, has the ability to have half of its body go into a state of sleep, and when one side is rested, the flamingo will swap legs and then let the other half sleep, but this has not been proven. Recent research has indicated that standing on one leg may allow the birds to conserve more body heat, given that they spend a significant amount of time wading in cold water. As well as standing in the water, flamingos may stamp their webbed feet in the mud to stir up food from the bottom.
Young flamingos hatch with grey plumage, but adults range from light pink to bright red due to aqueous bacteria and beta carotene obtained from their food supply. A well-fed, healthy flamingo is more vibrantly coloured and thus a more desirable mate; a white or pale flamingo, however, is usually unhealthy or malnourished. Captive flamingos are a notable exception; many turn a pale pink as they are not fed carotene at levels comparable to the wild. This is changing as more zoos begin to add prawns and other supplements to the diets of their flamingos.
American Flamingos, many standing on one leg, in Lago de Oviedo, Dominican Republic
Flamingos filter-feed on brine shrimp and blue-green algae. Their oddly shaped beaks are specially adapted to separate mud and silt from the food they eat, and are uniquely used upside-down. The filtering of food items is assisted by hairy structures called lamellae which line the mandibles, and the large rough-surfaced tongue. The pink or reddish color of flamingos comes from carotenoid proteins in their diet of animal and plant plankton. These proteins are broken down into pigments by liver enzymes. The source of this varies by species, and affects the saturation of color. Flamingos whose sole diet is blue-green algae are darker in color compared to those who get it second hand (e.g. from animals that have digested blue-green aglae). Zoo-fed flamingos, who often lack the color enhancer in their diet, may be given food with the additive canthaxanthin.

Artwork Comments

  • Valerie Anne Kelly
  • Dawn M. Becker
  • Carol2
  • Dawn M. Becker
  • Linda  Makiej
  • Dawn M. Becker
  • RoyalMastrpiece
  • Dawn M. Becker
  • RoyalMastrpiece
  • Dawn M. Becker
  • RoyalMastrpiece
  • Dawn M. Becker
  • RoyalMastrpiece
  • Dawn M. Becker
  • paintingsheep
  • Dawn M. Becker
  • GregTS
  • Dawn M. Becker
  • Mllrg973
  • Dawn M. Becker
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desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

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