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MAM-Milwaukee Art Museum ©

Dawn M. Becker

Milwaukee, United States

Artist's Description

4 sale
441 views as of 2-8-2012
Milwaukee Art Museum

1st Place in the Top 10 Challenge of" Wisconson Best Shot" 1-25-2011

Challenge

Featured in “The World As We It, or as we missed it” 11-03-2010

Won 2nd Place in the Top 10 Challenge 9-21-2010

Featured in “Color Me A Rainbow” 9-7-2010

Featured in “Midwestern United States Photography” 9-4-2010

The museum’s history began in 1882 when the Milwaukee Museum of Fine Arts MAM was founded. The museum dissolved six years later. In 1888, the Milwaukee Art Association was created by a group of German panorama artists and local businessmen; its first home was the Layton Art Gallery. In 1911, the Milwaukee Art Institute, another building constructed to hold other exhibitions and collections, was completed. The institute was built right next to the Layton Art Gallery. Alfred George Pelikan, who received his Masters in Fine Arts (MFA) from Columbia University, was the Director of the Milwaukee Art Institute from 1926 to 1942. The Milwaukee Art Center (now the Milwaukee Art Museum) was formed when the Milwaukee Art Institute and Layton Art Gallery merged their collections in 1957 and moved into a three-story building underneath the Eero Saarinen-designed Milwaukee County War Memorial. The Milwaukee Art Museum (MAM) commissioned Santiago Calatrava to design a 58,000 square foot addition to the Museum in 1994. Since completion of the first model in 1995 and as fundraising that exceeded expectations, the Museum made a strategic decision to expand the scope of the project. Major visitor amenities, such as the south terrace and a parking garage, were added to the design, and space for the expansion was increased to 142,050 square feet to accommodate the additions.
The expansion provides a 30 percent increase in overall gallery space, from 90,000 to 117,000 square feet.
The museum is home to over 25,000 works of art. Its permanent holdings contain an important collection of Old Masters and 19th-century and 20th-century artwork, as well as some of the nation’s best collections of German Expressionism, folk and Haitian art, American decorative arts, and post-1960 American art. The museum holds a large number of works by Georgia O’Keeffe, as well as many works by the German Expressionist, Gabriele Munter.
The MAM recently gained international recognition with the construction of the white concrete Quadracci Pavilion, designed by Santiago Calatrava (his first completed project in the United States), which opened on May 4, 2001. The pavilion was engineered by the Milwaukee-based engineering firm, Graef. The structure contains a movable, wing-like brise soleil which opens up for a wingspan of 217 feet during the day, folding over the tall, arched structure at night or during inclement weather. The brise soleil has since become a symbol for the city of Milwaukee. In addition to a gallery devoted to temporary exhibits, the pavilion also houses the museum’s store, as well as its restaurant, Cafe Calatrava. With the exception of the temporary exhibition gallery, the galleries themselves are contained in both the Saarinen building and a 1975 addition designed by local architect David Kahler. This addition was commissioned in 1969 to make room for other exhibits and donations.

Artwork Comments

  • Shanina Conway
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