St. Kateri Tekakwitha Icon by David Raber

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Kateri Tekakwitha was born in what is now upstate New York in 1656, the child of a Mohawk father and a Christianized Algonquin mother. At age four she was the only member of her family to survive smallpox, which affected her own health. Staying with her anti-Christian uncle, she was deeply impressed at age 11 by the lives and words of three visiting Jesuits, likely the first white Christians she had ever encountered. She began to lead a life inspired by the example of those men, and at age 20 she was instructed in religion and baptized Catherine (Kateri in Mohawk speech).
Harassed, stoned, and threatened with torture in her home village, she fled 200 miles to the mission of St. Francis Xavier at Sault Saint-Louis, near Montreal. There she came to be known as the “Lily of the Mohawks” in recognition of her kindness, prayer, faith, and heroic suffering. In December 2011, after evaluating the testimony of a young boy who claimed that his infection with flesh-eating bacteria disappeared after he prayed to her for intercession, Pope Benedict XVI recognized Kateri as a saint, and she was officially canonized in October, 2012. Kateri’s feast day is July 14.
(Account taken from Encyclopedia Britannica)

The picture’s border is made up of three types of wild lilies, referring to Kateri’s nickname, “Lily of the Mohawks.”
The saint is shown wearing a stylized version of her native garb, with a white robe to represent her baptismal garment.
She holds before her in both hands the cross of Christ, with the Chi Rho monogram of Christ at its center.

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