Winter Solstice Lunar Eclipse ~ 2010


Kimberly Chadwick

Marana, United States

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Sizing Information

Small 23.2" x 16.4"
Medium 33.1" x 23.3"
Large 46.9" x 33.0"
Note: Includes a 3/16" white border


  • Printed on 185gsm semi gloss poster paper
  • Custom cut to three maximum sizes – A2, A1 & A0
  • 5mm white border to assist in framing
  • Tack them to your bedroom door, or frame


Artist's Description

I will not make excuses, I have no talent for night time photography. However between the breeze and the clouds, some of them didn’t come out to bad with my little P&S. I am a daytime shooter…lol

Kimberly P-Chadwick’s Fan Page

The winter solstice occurs exactly when the Earth’s axial tilt is farthest away from the sun at its maximum of 23° 26’. Though the winter solstice lasts only a moment in time, the term is also a turning point to midwinter or the first day of winter to refer to the day on which it occurs. More evident to those in high latitudes, this occurs on the shortest day and longest night, when the sun’s daily maximum position in the sky is the lowest.

While it is merely a coincidence that the eclipse falls on the same date as this year’s winter solstice, for eclipse watchers this means that the moon will appear very high in the night sky, as the solstice marks the time when the Earth’s axial tilt is farthest away from the sun.

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth lines up directly between the sun and the moon, blocking the sun’s rays and casting a shadow on the moon. As the moon moves deeper and deeper into the Earth’s shadow, the moon changes color before your very eyes, turning from gray to an orange or deep shade of red.

The moon takes on this new color because indirect sunlight is still able to pass through Earth’s atmosphere and cast a glow on the moon. Our atmosphere filters out most of the blue colored light, leaving the red and orange hues that we see during a lunar eclipse. Extra particles in the atmosphere, from say a recent volcanic eruption, will cause the moon to appear a darker shade of red.

Unlike solar eclipses, lunar eclipses are perfectly safe to view without any special glasses or equipment. All you need is you own two eyes. So take this opportunity to stay up late and watch this stunning celestial phenomenon high in the night sky. It will be the last chance for sky watchers in the continental U.S. to see a total lunar eclipse until April 15, 2014.

Sources from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia & ScienceDaily: Your source for the latest research news and science breakthroughs — updated daily

Artwork Comments

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