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Pollination Series ~ 5 by Kimberly Chadwick

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Pollination is the process by which pollen is transferred in plants, thereby enabling fertilization and sexual reproduction. Pollen grains, which contain the male gametes (sperm) to where the female gamete(s) are contained within the carpel;1 in gymnosperms the pollen is directly applied to the ovule itself. The receptive part of the carpel is called a stigma in the flowers of angiosperms. The receptive part of the gymnosperm ovule is called the micropyle. Pollination is a necessary step in the reproduction of flowering plants, resulting in the production of offspring that are genetically diverse.

The study of pollination brings together many disciplines, such as botany, horticulture, entomology, and ecology. The pollination process as an interaction between flower and vector was first addressed in the 18th century by Christian Konrad Sprengel. It is important in horticulture and agriculture, because fruiting is dependent on fertilisation, which is the end result of pollination

BIOTIC Pollination
More commonly, the process of pollination requires pollinators: organisms that carry or move the pollen grains from the anther to the receptive part of the carpel or pistil. This is biotic pollination. The various flower traits (and combinations thereof) that differentially attract one type of pollinator or another are known as pollination syndromes.

There are roughly 200,000 varieties of animal pollinators in the wild, most of which are insects.2 Entomophily, pollination by insects, often occurs on plants that have developed colored petals and a strong scent to attract insects such as, bees, wasps and occasionally ants (Hymenoptera), beetles (Coleoptera), moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera), and flies (Diptera). In Zoophily, pollination is done by vertebrates such as birds and bats, particularly, hummingbirds, sunbirds, spiderhunters, honeyeaters, and fruit bats. Plants adapted to using bats or moths as pollinators typically have white petals and a strong scent, while plants that use birds as pollinators tend to develop red petals and rarely develop a scent (few birds have a sense of smell).

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


QUEEN BUTTERFLY
A smaller and duller desert counterpart of the Monarch is the queen, which is also poisonous. It does not make the heroic journey that the Monarch does, nor does it roost communally through winter in the thousands. Instead, the Queen graces desert gardens and foothills with its presence most of the year, often in large numbers. Small numbers of male queens do roost on certain plants during the evenings, converting chemicals from plants for use in mating.

In midsummer, the queen is one of the first to rouse in the early morning, sometimes being on the wing by 6a.m. The chysalids are gorgeous, a translucent, pale green with gold spots.

Tags

arizona, bug, butterfly, flower, insect, pollination, queen butterfly, nature, wildlife, kimberly chadwick

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My goal is to get my name out there among the vast ocean of Natural photographers. To be known for my skill with a Point & Shoot~

My images are not photo shopped. They have only been adjusted with basic sharpening, contrasting & saturation techniques. I believe that in order to appreciate Nature, you have to capture it as it is, naturally.

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Comments

  • Virginia N. Fred
    Virginia N. Fredabout 4 years ago

  • Bonnie Robert
    Bonnie Robertabout 4 years ago

    Wow, Kim this is Superb!! Excellent capture my dear!

  • Thank you Bonnie! It is time for bugs, and I do like capturing them..lol

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • Ray Clarke
    Ray Clarkeabout 4 years ago

  • Konstantinos Arvanitopoulos
    Konstantinos A...about 4 years ago

    Marvelous capture with great colours, well done Kimberly!

  • Thank you so much or visiting my world! I appreciate the time you took to look at this image, thank you !

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • artwhiz47
    artwhiz47about 4 years ago

    A beautiful catch – great to get the open-&-shut in one shot!

  • I felt pretty pleased to have captured it I will say, thank you ~☺

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • Krys Bailey
    Krys Baileyabout 4 years ago

    So pretty and love the composition!!!! Bravo, Kimberly! ;o)

  • Thank you VERY much Krys, one of my faves..lol

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • SilkyPix
    SilkyPixabout 4 years ago

    beautiful image, lovely butterflies
    j

  • Thank you so much SilkyPix!

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • Robert Abraham
    Robert Abrahamabout 4 years ago

    A really great capture of these Queen butterflies, love the composition in this shot

  • I appreciate that my new friend, thank you so very much!

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • TomBaumker
    TomBaumkerabout 4 years ago

    Nice work and they both are in focus…..Hugs…Tom

  • Hehe, I used please..lol ~ Thank you my dear!

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • Grandalf
    Grandalfabout 4 years ago

    Top capture, very nice image, Dave

  • Thank you much Sir! I appreciate that!

    – Kimberly Chadwick

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