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Taken in Tucson, Arizona with Canon Powershot SX10IS March 2010

Pollination is the process by which pollen is transferred in plants, thereby enabling fertilization and sexual reproduction. Pollen grains, which contain the male gametes (sperm) to where the female gamete(s) are contained within the carpel;1 in gymnosperms the pollen is directly applied to the ovule itself. The receptive part of the carpel is called a stigma in the flowers of angiosperms. The receptive part of the gymnosperm ovule is called the micropyle. Pollination is a necessary step in the reproduction of flowering plants, resulting in the production of offspring that are genetically diverse.

The study of pollination brings together many disciplines, such as botany, horticulture, entomology, and ecology. The pollination process as an interaction between flower and vector was first addressed in the 18th century by Christian Konrad Sprengel. It is important in horticulture and agriculture, because fruiting is dependent on fertilisation, which is the end result of pollination

BIOTIC Pollination
More commonly, the process of pollination requires pollinators: organisms that carry or move the pollen grains from the anther to the receptive part of the carpel or pistil. This is biotic pollination. The various flower traits (and combinations thereof) that differentially attract one type of pollinator or another are known as pollination syndromes.

There are roughly 200,000 varieties of animal pollinators in the wild, most of which are insects.2 Entomophily, pollination by insects, often occurs on plants that have developed colored petals and a strong scent to attract insects such as, bees, wasps and occasionally ants (Hymenoptera), beetles (Coleoptera), moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera), and flies (Diptera). In Zoophily, pollination is done by vertebrates such as birds and bats, particularly, hummingbirds, sunbirds, spiderhunters, honeyeaters, and fruit bats. Plants adapted to using bats or moths as pollinators typically have white petals and a strong scent, while plants that use birds as pollinators tend to develop red petals and rarely develop a scent (few birds have a sense of smell).

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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flower, spring, arizona, tucson, insect, bee, pollination, nature, wildlife, kimberly chadwick

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My images are not photo shopped. They have only been adjusted with basic sharpening, contrasting & saturation techniques. I believe that in order to appreciate Nature, you have to capture it as it is, naturally.

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Comments

  • Sherry Pundt
    Sherry Pundtover 4 years ago

    Oh WOW! Great shot! I love action of the bee, and of course the colors.

  • Thank you, The working of my next calender with any luck……..I appreciate that Poss!

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • David Friederich
    David Friederichover 4 years ago

    Beautiful sunflower. Your image captures spring spirit so very well. I appreciate all the research you are sharing, as well.

  • David, your visits always put a smile on my heart darlin! They make me feel positive, thank you for your supportive comment!

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • Krys Bailey
    Krys Baileyover 4 years ago

    Excellent timing Kimberly and I love the pose as the bee readies to dive!

  • Thank you Krys, I was pleased when I noticed it as well!

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • BigCatPhotos
    BigCatPhotosover 4 years ago

    What a fabulous bright and cheerful shot.

  • Thank you so very much!

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • artwhiz47
    artwhiz47over 4 years ago

    Excellent!

  • Thank you Sheila, happy Easter my Friend!

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • Trish Meyer
    Trish Meyerover 4 years ago

    Great “in flight” capture Kimberly!

  • Another luck shot! Thank you darlin!

    – Kimberly Chadwick

  • AsEyeSee
    AsEyeSeeabout 4 years ago

    This would make a great entry into the Arizona Group’s current challenge, Wildflowers Abound in Arizona. And, who knows, you might just walk away with a $20.00 voucher to spend here on Redbubble?!! Hurry only 2 days left to enter.

  • I will add it JD! I thought you were looking for more of a general collection, thank you !

    – Kimberly Chadwick

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