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Sonoran Scenery Series ~ 4 ~

Greeting Cards

Size:
$2.40
Kimberly Chadwick

Marana, United States

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Sizing Information

Small Greeting Card Large Greeting Card Postcard
4" x 6" 5" x 7.5" 4" x 6"

Features

  • 300gsm card with a satin finish
  • Supplied with kraft envelopes
  • Discount of 20% on every order of 8+ cards

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Artist's Description

I am trying to widen my photograph talents, or develop them into something bigger I guess. I have been pulling over when I see something that might look good through the lens. Practicing with framing and POVs. I took this shot in Marana, Az with my Canon Powershot SX10IS using a circular polarized filter. Please feel free to critic and give me any advise as you see fit.


Fouquieria splendens is a curious and unique desert plant of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. Common names include Ocotillo, Coachwhip, Jacob’s staff, and Vine Cactus, although it is not a true cactus. For much of the year, the plant appears to be an arrangement of large spiny dead sticks, although closer examination reveals that the stems are partly green. With rainfall the plant quickly becomes lush with small (2-4 cm) ovate leaves, which may remain for weeks or even months.

The stems may reach a diameter of 5 cm at the base, and the plant may grow to a height of 10 m. The plant branches very heavily at its base, but above that the branches are pole-like and only infrequently divide further, and specimens in cultivation may not exhibit any secondary branches. The leaf stalks harden into blunt spines, and new leaves sprout from the base of the spine. The bright red flowers appear in spring and summer, occurring as a group of small tube shapes at the tip of the stem. They are pollinated by hummingbirds or carpenter bees.

Ocotillo poles are a common fencing material in their native region, and often take root to form a living fence. Owing to light weight and an interesting pattern, these have been used for canes or walking sticks.

Artwork Comments

  • Robert Elliott
  • Kimberly Chadwick
  • Michael Cummings
  • Kimberly Chadwick
  • artwhiz47
  • Kimberly Chadwick
  • Trish Meyer
  • Kimberly Chadwick
  • Judy Grant
  • Kimberly Chadwick
  • Rstrick2
  • Kimberly Chadwick
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

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