Atalaya Castle

Photographic Prints

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©Dawne M. Dunton

Myrtle Beach, United States

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Sizing Information

Small 12.0" x 8.0"
Medium 18.0" x 12.0"
Large 24.0" x 16.0"
X large 30.0" x 19.9"

Features

  • Superior quality silver halide prints
  • Archival quality Kodak Endura paper
  • Lustre: Professional photo paper with a fine grain pebble texture
  • Metallic: Glossy finish and metallic appearance to create images with exceptional visual interest and depth

Reviews

Artist's Description

CLICK PHOTO FOR A LARGER VIEW

Atalaya Castle, also known as Atalaya, was the winter home of industrialist and philanthropist Archer M. Huntington and his wife, the sculptor Anna Hyatt Huntington, located near the Atlantic coast in Murrells Inlet, Georgetown County, South Carolina. USA

Archer Huntington was a noted scholar of Spanish culture and art, and designed the residence in the Moorish Revival and Mediterranean Revival architecture styles from Spanish Andalusian coast models.

Atalaya was built near the Atlantic Ocean in northeastern South Carolina, within present day Huntington Beach State Park. The location was chosen as a milder winter retreat for the health of Anna Huntington, who suffered from tuberculosis from the mid-twenties to the mid-thirties.

The 200 by 200 foot (60 by 60 m) masonry structure was built from 1931 to 1933 apparently without drawn plans, Archer Huntington had already designed the residence for them with his detailed imagination ‘in his head.’ Local labor was used at Archer Huntington’s insistence to provide work for a community hard hit by the Great Depression.

During World War II the Huntingtons vacated Atalaya and provided it to the Army Air Corps for use from 1942-1946.

The Huntingtons last used Atalaya as their winter home in 1947. Most of the furnishings were sent to New York City after Mr. Huntington’s death in 1955. The studio equipment was moved to a new studio at Brookgreen Gardens just across U.S. Route 17, which cut through the Huntingtons’ former contiguous property.

The 2,500 acre tract was leased to the state in 1960 for use as a state park. Mrs. Huntington died in 1973.

Atalaya was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984, and was included in the designation of Atalaya and Brookgreen Gardens as a National Historic Landmark in 1984.

Artwork Comments

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