Hickory, dickory, dock. 25% off Acrylic Blocks and Clocks. Use code TIMEBLOCK25

Window and Ghost From So Very Long Ago

Debbie Robbins

Moosup, United States

  • Available
    Products
    1
  • Artist
    Notes
  • Artwork Comments 253

Stationery

Artist's Description


Faraway Friends Oct. 25, 2010
Windows With A Flair June 17, 2010

LOOK for the GIRL in this WINDOW!!!! :))))
View LARGE…..

Clark’s Fall’s Grist Mill
North Stonington, CT… USA

50 FAVS, and 486 Views, June 17, 2011

I graduated from Wheeler High School in North Stonington, CT… One of my classmates was John Palmer…

John is the owner of the site that was the Clark’s Falls Grist Mill… When he bought it he kept it operating for quite a while… I thought that was such a very cool thing for him to do…

Today it is no longer in operation and sadly it is deteriorating right before our eyes…

John is a HARD working guy. His Family owns a Dairy Farm in town, and it is one of the FEW LEFT that are working and milking cows… and since he was a boy he has always worked on the family farm… So we were all thrilled when he bought the Grist Mill down the road from where the farm is and he did his best to keep it going, but truthfully I think he just didn’t have the time to devote to it, and maintain it… The elder generations are gone now, and as John has aged (which means I have too)… it has fallen to him to do much more on the FARM… So I understand why this has happened… just too bad he couldn’t have sold it and someone could have kept it going…

NOW PLEASE VIEW LARGE:
And let me know if you see the Girl in the dress in this shot!!!!!! Spooky and Freaking me out!!! LOL

Here is the Grist Mill:

And this is the Sign still hanging on the front…

From North Stonington History, Wikepedia:

Mills during the late 18th Century quickly began to proliferate in the village along the Shunock River to such an extent that the locale took the name of “Milltown,” and the Avery family and other landowners began to sell lots along what is now the western end of Main Street to house businesses and dwellings for workers in the mills. Smaller communities, with their own churches, post offices, mills, and stores, emerged in Burch’s Falls (renamed Clark’s Falls in the 1860s) and Laurel Glen, both in the eastern end of town, and Ashwillet and Pendleton Hill (known as Pauchunganuc until the 1840s), located respectively in the northwestern and northeastern corners of the town. Individual mills also emerged throughout the town to meet the grain and lumber milling needs of local communities at a distance from the five towns within the town.

Artwork Comments

  • Dawn Becker
  • Debbie Robbins
  • Wendy  Chapman
  • Debbie Robbins
  • JohnDSmith
  • Debbie Robbins
  • RebeccaBlackman
  • Debbie Robbins
  • stephaniek
  • Debbie Robbins
  • Dawn Becker
  • Debbie Robbins
  • Debbie Robbins
  • Debbie Robbins
  • Jan Siemucha
  • Debbie Robbins
  • Linda Miller Gesualdo
  • Debbie Robbins
  • Marcia Plante
  • Debbie Robbins
  • Jan Siemucha
  • Debbie Robbins
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

10% off

for joining the Redbubble mailing list

Receive exclusive deals and awesome artist news and content right to your inbox. Free for your convenience.