Early Evening Along the Royal Mile

Christine Smith

Grovedale, Australia

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FEATURED in Just Fun 22-07-2013
FEATURED in A World of EOS 23-07-2013

Camera: Canon EOS 50D, Lens: @ 33mm, ISO: 400, Aperture: f5.6, Shutter: 1/50

Taken looking down the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, Scotland. The Royal Mile, from the castle to the palace is classes as a UNESCO World Heritage site. Tron Kirk, on the left, came about during the ‘Bishops War’ in the 17th century by Charles I when he created Edinburgh a city and tried to impose an episcopal structure onto the Scottish Church and turned the High Kirk into St. Giles Cathedral by making it the seat of the Bishop of Edinburgh. In retaliation the congregation of the High Kirk commissioned a new church to be built just along the road. The land was purchased by the parish from Dr. William Scott, MD, for £1000 Scots. It was erected between 1636 and 1647 to a design by John Mylne, Royal master mason. The design mixed Palladian and Gothic elements and was inspired by contemporary Dutch architecture. The width of the building was reduced when both side aisles were removed in 1785 to accommodate the South Bridge and Blair Street leading to Hunter Square. The original wooden spire was replaced in 1829 after it was destroyed by a fire, but inside you can still see the original hammerbeam roofing. The Tron, which got its name due to the weighing scales which were housed here well into the 18th century, was closed as a church in 1952 and was acquired by the City of Edinburgh Council, the congregation moving to a new church in the Moredun area of the city. It was subsequently left to decay, and the interiors were eventually gutted. Excavations then took place under the church, from within, in 1974, which revealed some foundations of 16th century buildings in a long-vanished close named Marlins Wynd. It was the traditional focus of the capital’s Hogmanay celebrations but has been largely unused since its congregation left in 1952. In June 3013 it was announced that Edinburgh’s Tron Kirk is to become a visitor centre, telling the story of Scotland’s World Heritage Sites. Conservation organisation, Edinburgh World Heritage, has submitted the plans to building owner Edinburgh City Council.

Artwork Comments

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