Bleeding heart by Celeste Mookherjee

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Prickly pear cactus is a common sight in Southern California, and sometimes the ripe fruit splits in the heat of the sun and “bleeds” as this one is doing. (The fruit is edible, as are the green pads, or “nopales,” although care must be taken to fully remove the spiny parts.) (Olympus E-5 & Zuiko 70-300mm zoom at 215mm [430mm in full-frame 35mm equivalent], f/5.1, 1/800 sec., ISO 100, midday sun, handheld.)

Featured in RedBubble Explore, 7 Day Popular Art, Design & Photography (February 2013)

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Tags

bleeding, cactus, celeste m, celeste mookherjee, flora, green, heart, heartbreak, hurt, hurting, nopales, opuntia, prickly pear, red

Passionate about photography, especially nature subjects!

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Comments

  • Celeste Mookherjee
    Celeste Mookhe...over 1 year ago

    Prickly pear cactus is a common sight in Southern California, and sometimes the ripe fruit splits in the heat of the sun and “bleeds” as this one is doing. (The fruit is edible, as are the green pads, or “nopales,” although care must be taken to fully remove the spiny parts.)

  • Bette Devine
    Bette Devineover 1 year ago

    Well named, because it looks a bit gory! Are you aware of the way this plant has become an environmental pest in Australia? Just proves again how Californian plant like Australia and vice versa! Good to see you breaking the posting drought, Celeste!

  • Thanks for the great comment, Bette! Yes, I read about the way these cacti have become a pest in Australia. They are not especially well-behaved here either. :) This is from my archives. I’ve been dealing with health issues and unable to get out with my camera for some time, unfortunately.

    – Celeste Mookherjee

  • debidabble
    debidabbleover 1 year ago

  • Thank you!

    – Celeste Mookherjee

  • Lynn Gedeon
    Lynn Gedeonover 1 year ago

    Beautiful capture, Celeste! Love the color contrast and texture!

  • Thanks very much, Lynn!

    – Celeste Mookherjee

  • Larry Trupp
    Larry Truppover 1 year ago

    Very nice capture

  • Thank you, Larry!

    – Celeste Mookherjee

  • Anita Pollak
    Anita Pollakover 1 year ago

    Great title for a most interesting and unusual capture, Celeste. It’s great to see that you’re posting again!

  • Thanks very much, Anita! I pulled this from my archives because I thought it was a good fit for a particular challenge.

    – Celeste Mookherjee

  • vigor
    vigorover 1 year ago

    Great find, not something I would ever see!

  • Thank you! These are heartier than some cacti but still nothing you would see in a cold climate (assuming that’s your case).

    – Celeste Mookherjee

  • Joy Watson
    Joy Watsonover 1 year ago

    Great work and clarity. I have never seen this close up before. Beautiful.

  • Thank you, Joy! We have lots of these in my area, but the “bleeding” was a little unusual and seemed worth capturing.

    – Celeste Mookherjee

  • Felix Haryanto
    Felix Haryantoover 1 year ago

    Good found my friend! Amazing plant

  • Thanks very much, Felix! Although they are common in my area, I agree they are amazing plants.

    – Celeste Mookherjee

  • Teresa Pople
    Teresa Popleover 1 year ago

    Wonderful study of this unusual fruit Celeste . . Love the detail . .x

  • Thank you, Teresa! The fruit is common here, but I suspect it would not grow in England. ;)

    – Celeste Mookherjee

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