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The general plumage of the Tawny Frogmouth is silver-grey, slightly paler below, streaked and mottled with black and rufous. A second plumage phase also occurs, with birds being russet-red. The eye is yellow in both forms, and the wide, heavy bill is olive-grey to blackish. Tawny Frogmouths are nocturnal birds (night birds). During the day, they perch on tree branches, often low down, camouflaged as part of the tree.
The bulk of the Tawny Frogmouth’s diet is made up of nocturnal insects, worms, slugs and snails. Small mammals, reptiles, frogs and birds are also eaten. Most food is obtained by pouncing to the ground from a tree or other elevated perch. Some prey items, such as moths, are caught in flight
The leading edges of the first primary (wing) feathers of the Tawny Frogmouth are fringed to allow for silent flight.
Canon 50D, EF70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM

Tags

tawny frogmouth, podargus strigoides, nighjar, australian, nocturnal, predator

Many thanks for checking out my photos, please feel free to give feedback! My wanderings in nature and observations of birds, particularly raptors, is what gives me great joy and constantly reminds me of the beauty and strength of life. My favourites are raptors, I love their freedom, grace, ruthlessness, pride, adaptability and flexibility and I learn much about parenting, protection and blind faith from them.
Please feel free to check out my website:
www.byronbaybackyard.com.au

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Comments

  • trish725
    trish725over 3 years ago

    Great capture :-) He certainly has perfect camouflage!

  • Thanks Trish, he’s just come back, I haven’t seen him or his partner for months!

    – byronbackyard

  • Ray Clarke
    Ray Clarkeover 3 years ago

  • Denzil
    Denzilover 3 years ago

    Fantastic catch!!! Shows their really strange face very well … Is this taken in the wild??

  • Many thanks. It is one of a pair who are ‘wild’ (as in they are not in captivity) but they return to a tree in a suburban tree, and have for many years. However most people don’t even know they’re there!

    – byronbackyard

  • shortshooter-Al
    shortshooter-Alover 3 years ago

    His camoflage is amazing. Great capture Deb.

  • Many thanks Al, such fascinating, little creatures!

    – byronbackyard

  • swaby
    swabyover 3 years ago

    wonderful shot I agree great camo on this beautiful creature!

  • Many thanks for your kind comment!

    – byronbackyard

  • mspfoto
    mspfotoover 3 years ago

    Wow that’s almost inadvisable great find and capture.

  • Many thanks, I just had one in the tree in my backyard, they’re so gorgeously cute!

    – byronbackyard

  • Alwyn Simple
    Alwyn Simpleover 3 years ago

    Gee they are hard to find Deb. One thing once you do find them they seem to roost in the same tree. Great shot Deb.

  • Thanks Alwyn, yes this one of a pair that return to the same tree, although sometimes they’re not there for months. I did have one in my backyard last night, little cutie!

    – byronbackyard

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