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The Thames & London Panorama by Bryan Freeman
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The Thames & London Panorama by 


#Click on image to view it larger – It looks better that way!#

Took this on our trip to the UK in April 2010. Taken high up in the London Eye. Ideally I wanted 3 shots wide HDR panorama but the movement was too great and I couldn’t do it. I reckon if we had gone around for another spin then I’d have nailed it. ;-) Oh well, there’s always next time I suppose.

Canon 7D
Canon Lens 15-85mm

Panorama of 2 HDR images and each image is comprised of 3 (handheld) photos.
HDR created and tonemapped using Photomatix, then merged in PS

Info below from
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Museum

The British Museum is a museum of human history and culture in London. Its collections, which number more than seven million objects,3 are amongst the largest and most comprehensive in the world and originate from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its beginnings to the present.[a]

The British Museum was established in 1753, largely based on the collections of the physician and scientist Sir Hans Sloane. The museum first opened to the public on 15 January 1759 in Montagu House in Bloomsbury, on the site of the current museum building. Its expansion over the following two and a half centuries was largely a result of an expanding British colonial footprint and has resulted in the creation of several branch institutions, the first being the British Museum (Natural History) in South Kensington in 1887. Some objects in the collection, most notably the Elgin Marbles from the Parthenon, are the objects of intense controversy and calls for restitution to their countries of origin.

Until 1997, when the British Library (previously centred on the Round Reading Room) moved to a new site, the British Museum was unique in that it housed both a national museum of antiquities and a national library in the same building. The museum is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, and as with all other national museums in the United Kingdom it charges no admission fee.4 Since 2002 the director of the museum has been Neil MacGregor.5 Conservative Peer Lord Sainsbury has pledged to donate £25 million to the Museum to aid funding for a large scale extension, set to make it the world’s largest museum by collection upon completion.

Like other publicly funded national museums in the United Kingdom, the British Museum does not levy an admission charge.

Foundation (1753)

On 7 June 1753, King George II gave his formal assent to the Act of Parliament which established the British Museum. The Foundation Act, added two other libraries to the Sloane collection. The Cottonian Library, assembled by Sir Robert Cotton, dated back to Elizabethan times and the Harleian library, the collection of the Earls of Oxford. They were joined in 1757 by the Royal Library, assembled by various British monarchs. Together these four “foundation collections” included many of the most treasured books now in the British Library including the Lindisfarne Gospels and the sole surviving copy of Beowulf.

The British Museum was the first of a new kind of museum – national, belonging to neither church nor king, freely open to the public and aiming to collect everything. Sloane’s collection, whilst including a vast miscellany of objects, tended to reflect his scientific interests. The addition of the Cotton and Harley manuscripts introduced a literary and antiquarian element and meant that the British Museum now became both national museum and library.

The following is from Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_History_Mu...

The Natural History Museum is one of three large museums on Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London, England (the others are the Science Museum, and the Victoria and Albert Museum). Its main frontage is on Cromwell Road. The museum is an exempt charity, and a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

The museum is home to life and earth science specimens comprising some 70 million items within five main collections: Botany, Entomology, Mineralogy, Palaeontology and Zoology. The museum is a world-renowned centre of research, specialising in taxonomy, identification and conservation. Given the age of the institution, many of the collections have great historical as well as scientific value, such as specimens collected by Darwin. The Natural History Museum Library contains extensive books, journals, manuscripts, and artwork collections linked to the work and research of the scientific departments. Access to the library is by appointment only.

The museum is particularly famous for its exhibition of dinosaur skeletons, and ornate architecture — sometimes dubbed a cathedral of nature — both exemplified by the large Diplodocus cast which dominates the vaulted central hall.

Originating from collections within the British Museum, the landmark Alfred Waterhouse building was built and opened by 1881, and later incorporated the Geological Museum. The Darwin Centre is a more recent addition, partly designed as a modern facility for storing the valuable collections.

Other images from in and around London/Brighton below:

More about St Dunstan’s in the East from Wikipedia below:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Dunstan-in-the-...

The church was built about 1100. It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple, designed by Sir Christopher Wren, was added 30 years later. This was unusual in that Wren designed it in the Gothic style, to match the old church.

By the early 19th century the church was in a very poor state; and it was rebuilt between 1817 and 1821 by David Laing, with assistance by William Tite. Wren’s steeple was retained in the new building.

The church was severely damaged in the Blitz of 1941, during the Second World War. In the re-organisation of the Anglican Church in London following the War it was decided not to rebuild St Dunstan’s, and in 1967 the City of London Corporation decided to turn the ruins of the church into a public garden. This was opened in 1971.

Wren’s tower and steeple survived the bombs intact and now house the All Hallows House Foundation, a registered charity that provides core and complementary health services to those who live or work in the City of London, through its trading arm, The Wren Clinic. Of the rest of the church only the north and south walls remain. A lawn and trees have been planted within the ruins and a low fountain sits in the middle of the nave. The gardens are claimed to be the most beautiful public gardens in the City of London.

The church is now comprised within the parish of All Hallows by the Tower and occasional open-air services are held in the church, such as on Palm Sunday prior to a procession to All Hallows by the Tower along St Dunstan’s Hill and Great Tower Street. The church ruin was designated a Grade I listed building on 4 January 1950.

More about St Dunstan below from Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunstan

Dunstan (born 909 — died 19 May 988) was an Abbot of Glastonbury Abbey, a Bishop of Worcester, a Bishop of London, and an Archbishop of Canterbury, later canonised as a saint. His work restored monastic life in England and reformed the English Church. His 11th-century biographer, Osbern, himself an artist and scribe, states that Dunstan was skilled in “making a picture and forming letters”, as were other clergy of his age who reached senior rank.

Dunstan served as an important minister of state to several English kings. He was the most popular saint in England for nearly two centuries, having gained fame for the many stories of his greatness, not least among which were those concerning his famed cunning in defeating the Devil.

If you’d like to see my work that has been FEATURED (WOOHOO!) in a Group then Click -FEATURED!

The links below will take you to various sets of my work:

  1. Persepolis
  2. Pasargadae
  3. Persia
  4. Esfahan – Iran
  5. Shiraz – Iran
  6. Time Lapse
  7. Black & White
  8. High Dynamic Range – HDR
  9. Birds
  10. Sydney
  11. Luna Park – Sydney
  12. Long Flat – NSW
  13. Sofala
  14. Fireworks

info from Wikipedia

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london, the thames, thames, river, england, bryan freeman, panorama, panoramic, london eye, brian freeman

I live in Sydney, Australia and love to travel. I enjoy creating landscapes scenes using my Canon DSLR cameras and lenses.

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