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The Royal Pavilion - Brighton - England by Bryan Freeman

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The Royal Pavilion - Brighton - England by 


#Click on image to view it larger – It looks better that way!#

One of the entrance gates to the Royal Pavillion in Brighton, England.

I took this on our holiday to the UK in April this year (2010).

You’ve really got to pay the money, go inside and see the opulence and beauty of the Pavillion at Brighton. It’s mind numbingly stunning. Not bad creating something like this when the majority of your subjects are eking out a meagre existence! But then again, we wouldn’t have this magnificent building if royalty really cared about the well-being of their subjects, would we! (Nothing’s changed over the centuries either)

HDR, 3 images, tonemapped then adjusted a tad, in PS.

Canon 7D
Canon Lens 15-85mm

Info from Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Pavilion

The Royal Pavilion is a former royal residence located in Brighton, England. It was built in three campaigns, beginning in 1787, as a seaside retreat for George, Prince of Wales, from 1811 Prince Regent. It is often referred to as the Brighton Pavilion. It is built in the Indo-Saracenic style prevalent in India for most of the 19th century, with the most extravagant chinoiserie interiors ever executed in the British Isles.

History
The Prince of Wales, who later became King George IV, first visited Brighton in 1783, soon after achieving his majority. The seaside town had become fashionable through the residence of George’s uncle, the Duke of Cumberland, whose tastes for cuisine, gaming, the theatre and fast living the young prince shared, and with whom he lodged in Brighton at Grove House. In addition, his physician advised him that the seawater would be beneficial for his gout. In 1786, under a financial cloud that had been examined in Parliament for the extravagances incurred in building Carlton House, London, he rented a modest erstwhile farmhouse facing the Steine, a grassy area of Brighton used as a promenade by visitors. Being remote from the Royal Court in London, the Pavilion was also a discreet location for the Prince to enjoy liaisons with his long-time companion, Mrs Fitzherbert. The Prince had wished to marry her, and did so in secrecy, as her Roman Catholicism ruled out marriage under the Royal Marriages Act.

In 1787 the designer of Carlton House, Henry Holland, was employed to enlarge the existing building, which became one wing of the Marine Pavilion, flanking a central rotunda, which contained only three main rooms, a breakfast room, dining room and library, fitted out in Holland’s French-influenced neoclassical style, with decorative paintings by Biagio Rebecca. In 1801-02 the Pavilion was enlarged with a new dining room and conservatory, to designs of Peter Frederick Robinson, in Holland’s office. The Prince also purchased land surrounding the property, on which a grand riding school and stables were built in an Indian style in 1803-08, to designs by William Porden that dwarfed the Marine Pavilion, in providing stabling for sixty horses.

Between 1815 and 1822 the designer John Nash redesigned and greatly extended the Pavilion, and it is the work of Nash which can be seen today. The palace looks rather striking in the middle of Brighton, having a very Indian appearance on the outside. However, the fanciful interior design, primarily by Frederick Crace and the little-known decorative painter Robert Jones, is heavily influenced by both Chinese and Indian fashion (with Mughal and Islamic architectural elements). It is a prime example of the exoticism that was an alternative to more classicising mainstream taste in the Regency style.

If you’d like to see my work that has been FEATURED (WOOHOO!) in a Group then Click -FEATURED!

The links below will take you to various sets of my work:

  1. Persepolis
  2. Pasargadae
  3. Persia
  4. Esfahan – Iran
  5. Shiraz – Iran
  6. Time Lapse
  7. Black & White
  8. High Dynamic Range – HDR
  9. Birds
  10. Sydney
  11. Luna Park – Sydney
  12. Long Flat – NSW
  13. Sofala
  14. Fireworks

Info from Wikipedia

Tags

brighton, royal pavillion, england, uk, bryan freeman, gardens, hdr, brian freeman, royal, royalty, palace, arch, garden

I live in Sydney, Australia and love to travel. I enjoy creating landscapes scenes using my Canon DSLR cameras and lenses.

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Comments

  • reflector
    reflectorover 3 years ago

    A very nice place and a vivid and crisp catch !

  • Thanks very much, appreciated.

    – Bryan Freeman

  • Ian Stevenson
    Ian Stevensonover 3 years ago

    Excellent capture.

  • Thanks Ian.

    – Bryan Freeman

  • DeeZ (D L Honeycutt)
    DeeZ (D L Hone...about 2 years ago

    Excellent!

    June 6, 2012
    Please submit this work within a week of award receipt to assure acceptance in the group as I do moderation in groups of six images by member!

  • Thanks Dee, appreciated.

    – Bryan Freeman

  • dgscotland
    dgscotlandabout 2 years ago

    Nicely framed Bryan.

    Click the banner to take you to the group. Your work is welcome here and please enjoy it.

  • Thanks mate.

    – Bryan Freeman

  • Marie Sharp
    Marie Sharpabout 2 years ago

  • Awesome news! Thanks very much Marie

    – Bryan Freeman

  • Chris Lord
    Chris Lordabout 2 years ago

    I grew up in Brighton and agree entirely about this wonderful building, thanks for jogging the memory cells.

  • Thanks Chris.

    – Bryan Freeman

  • Dave Godden
    Dave Goddenabout 2 years ago

    Congratulations on your feature 14.06.2012

  • Awesome news! Thanks very much Dave.

    – Bryan Freeman

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