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Upon Reflection - Chehel Sotoun - 40 Columns Palace - Esfahan - Iran by Bryan Freeman
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Upon Reflection - Chehel Sotoun - 40 Columns Palace - Esfahan - Iran by 


#Click on image to view it larger – It looks better that way!#

This is Chehel Sotoun also known as the Palace of 40 Columns. I only counted 20 and then thought, well, there must be another 20 around the back or inside but no, that’d be too logical. There’s a pond at the front of the building and if you look at it you’ll see the other 20 columns reflected in it! ;-)

Canon 7D
Canon Lens 15-85mm

Topaz plugin in PS

9 October 2010 Featured in All That’s Archaeology

The following is from Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chehel_Sotoun

Chehel Sotoun (also Chehel Sotoon, Persian: چهل ستون) is a pavilion in the middle of a park at the far end of a long pool, in Isfahan, Iran, built by Shah Abbas II to be used for his entertainment and receptions. In this palace, Shah Abbas II and his successors would receive dignitaries and ambassadors, either on the terrace or in one of the stately reception halls.

The name, meaning “Forty Columns” in Persian, was inspired by the twenty slender wooden columns supporting the entrance pavilion, which, when reflected in the waters of the fountain, are said to appear to be forty.1

As with Ali Qapu, the palace contains many frescoes and paintings on ceramic. Many of the ceramic panels have been dispersed and are now in the possession of major museums in the west. They depict specific historical scenes such as a reception for an Uzbek King in 1646, when the palace had just been completed; a banquet in honor of the Emir of Bukhara in 1611; the battle of Chalderan against the Ottoman Sultan Selim I in 1514 in which the Persians fought without firearms; the welcome extended to the Mughal Emperor, Humayun who took refuge in Iran in 1544; the battle of Taher-Abad in 1510 where the Safavid Shah Ismail I vanquished and killed the Uzbek King. A more recent painting depicts Nader Shah’s victory against the Indian Army at Karnal in 1739. There are also less historical, but even more aesthetic compositions in the traditional miniature style which celebrate the joy of life and love.

Esfahan is a great city to visit with lots of places to see. There are a multitude of small shops with artists selling their work and also, producing it while they wait for a buyer.

Esfahan is well known for their artists who produce miniature paintings. They also produce fantastic enamelled copper plates with awesome intricate designs. You get used to the cheap prices very quickly and when a salesman in the bazaar says the price for a very intricate enamel plate is $25.00, you find it exhorbitant and let them know. Of course, they want to haggle and this is where it pays to have a local step in and help you out. It’s all over in a matter of a few mibutes and all that is left for you to do is shell out the money. ;-) Now, you’re the proud owner of a beautiful, intricately painted enamel copper plate….oh, and a gourd! :-b

The following info is from Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheikh_Lotf_Allah_...
Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque (Persian: مسجد شيخ لطف الّله – Masjed-e Sheikh Lotf-ollah) is one of the architectural masterpieces of Safavid Iranian architecture, standing on the eastern side of Naghsh-i Jahan Square, Isfahan, Iran.

Construction of the mosque started in 1615 and was finished in 1618. It was built by Shah Abbas I of the Safavid dynasty. The builing functioned as a prayer hall and lecture hall.

Inside Imam Mosque below:

Entrance to Imam Mosque:

Part of the bazaar that encircles Imam Square

Further info from http://archnet.org/library/sites/one-site.jsp?s...
The two kilometer bazaar is a vaulted street that links the old city, the Friday mosque and old maydan with Shah Abbas’ new maydan. The entry at the Maydan-i Shah is marked by a large portal that mirrors in form the entrance portal of the Shah Mosque. The iwan of the bazaar portal is flanked by galleries and crowned with the representation of Sagittarius in mosaic tile.

The portal accesses the royal bazaar, the royal mint and the royal caravanserai, leading to the major artery of the bazaar. Mosques, hamams and khans lead off this main street, much of which is lit by circular openings cut into the brick vaults, shafts of light dotting the passage at certain times of day.

Further details of Esfahan (Isfahan) below from Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esfahan

Isfahan is located on the main north-south and east-west routes crossing Iran, and was once one of the largest cities in the world. It flourished from 1050 to 1722, particularly in the 16th century under the Safavid dynasty, when it became the capital of Persia for the second time in its history. Even today, the city retains much of its past glory. It is famous for its Islamic architecture, with many beautiful boulevards, covered bridges, palaces, mosques, and minarets. This led to the Persian proverb “’Esfahān nesf-e jahān ast” (Isfahan is half of the world).

Beautiful bridges in Esfahan below:
Si-o-Seh Pol – Esfahan – Iran – Daylight

Si-o-Seh Pol below at night

The next bridge along from this one is Ferdowsi Bridge:

If you’d like to see my work that has been FEATURED (WOOHOO!) in a Group then Click -FEATURED!

The links below will take you to various sets of my work:

  1. Persepolis
  2. Pasargadae
  3. Persia
  4. Esfahan – Iran
  5. Shiraz – Iran
  6. Time Lapse
  7. Black & White
  8. High Dynamic Range – HDR
  9. Birds
  10. Sydney
  11. Luna Park – Sydney
  12. Long Flat – NSW
  13. Sofala
  14. Fireworks

Info from Wikipedia

I live in Sydney, Australia and love to travel. I enjoy creating landscapes scenes using my Canon DSLR cameras and lenses.

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