116 - GUSTAVE DORE- DAVE EDWARDS - INK - 1985

BLYTHART

Blyth, United Kingdom

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As of 7th September 2012, this drawing has had 19 favouritings and 516 viewings.

FEATURED BY INSPIRED ART GROUP – 28th April 2010

FEATURED BY THE PEN AND INK CORNER GROUP – 8th September 2012

FEATURED BY REDBUBBLE BOOMERS GROUP – 10th September 2012

FEATURED BY CREATIVE, TALENTED & UNKNOWN GROUP – 11th September 2012

FEATURED BY BACK IN BLACK GROUP – 14th September 2012

FEATURED BY NOT THE COMFY CHAIR GROUP – 23rd September 2012

FEATURED BY ART & PHOTOGRAPHY GROUP – 23rd November 2012

FEATURED BY ART AT ITS BEST GROUP – 4th May 2013

This is a portrait I did twenty-four years ago of one of my favourite Victorian artists. I have admired this man’s work since 1974.

Thiose who know me will admit I am not often given to boasting about my work and I am not boasting here, but despite its faults this is a drawing I am not ashamed of, to say the least.

Paul Gustave Doré; January 6, 1832 – January 23, 1883) was a French artist, engraver, illustrator and sculptor. Doré worked primarily with wood engraving and steel engraving.
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Doré was born in Strasbourg and his first illustrated story was published at the age of fifteen. At age five he was a prodigy artist already creating drawings. When he turned 12 he began to carve his art in stone. Doré began work as a literary illustrator in Paris. Doré commissions include works by Rabelais, Balzac, Milton and Dante. In 1853 Doré was asked to illustrate the works of Lord Byron. This commission was followed by additional work for British publishers, including a new illustrated English Bible. In 1863, Doré illustrated a French edition of Cervantes’s Don Quixote, and his illustrations of the knight and his squire Sancho Panza have become so famous that they have influenced subsequent readers, artists, and stage and film directors’ ideas of the physical “look” of the two characters. Doré also illustrated an oversized edition of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven”, an endeavor that earned him 30,000 francs from publisher Harper & Brothers in 1883.
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Doré’s English Bible (1866) was a great success, and in 1867 Doré had a major exhibition of his work in London. This exhibition led to the foundation of the Doré Gallery in New Bond Street. In 1869, Blanchard Jerrold, the son of Douglas William Jerrold, suggested that they work together to produce a comprehensive portrait of London. Jerrold had gotten the idea from The Microcosm of London produced by Rudolph Ackermann, William Pyne, and Thomas Rowlandson in 1808. Doré signed a five-year project with the publishers Grant & Co that involved his staying in London for three months a year. He was paid the vast sum of £10,000 a year for his work. He was mainly known for his paintings, contrary to popular belief about his wood carvings. His paintings are world renowned, but his woodcuts are where he really excelled.
(Courtesy of Wikipedia)

Artwork Comments

  • Tom Gomez
  • Lance Leopold
  • mmargot
  • Deborah Holman
  • dimarie
  • Orla Cahill
  • BLYTHART
  • Patricia L. Ballard
  • BLYTHART
  • Brian Towers
  • BLYTHART
  • Anita Inverarity
  • BLYTHART
  • andrea311
  • BLYTHART
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