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J2 Submarine - Conning Tower (side view)

Greg Blair

Parkdale, Australia

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Artist's Description

The J2 Submarine is one of several scuttled outside of Port Phillip Bay in Bass Strait towards Barwon Heads. It sits at a depth of 38-40 metres. This image was taken using a Nikon F-80 and Sigma 15mm fisheye in an Ikelite housing. The film used was FujiPress 800.

J-Class Submarine History
Seven J class submarines were built in 1915 to 1916 for the Royal Navy during the First World War. At that time they were the fastest in the world, with a surface speed of 19 knots and a submerged speed of 10 knots. The J class subs were 84 metres long and carried a crew of 44.

In 1919, Britain presented the Royal Australian Navy with six submarines however extremely high operating costs together with a huge post-war cut in the defence budget resulted in a decision to decommission and scrap the submarines. They were sold to a Melbourne salvage company in 1924 and all six J class submarines were eventually scuttled. Two became breakwaters, the J7 at Sandringham, and J3 at Swan Island. In 1926 the J1, J2, J4 and J5 were towed outside the Port Phillip Bay heads and sunk in the ships’ graveyard.

On 10 January 1997, this particular submarine, the J2, was the site of a diving fataility, the diver becoming trapped inside and running out of air and drowning.

Artwork Comments

  • Stephanie Johnson
  • Greg Blair
  • Jenna
  • helene
  • Greg Blair
  • Greg Blair
  • mikrin
  • Robert Mullner
  • Rita  H. Ireland
  • Small-Lion
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