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harriet tubman by arteology

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Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Ross; c. 1820 or 1821 – March 10, 1913) was an African-American abolitionist, humanitarian, and Union spy during the American Civil War. After escaping from slavery, into which she was born, she made thirteen missions to rescue over seventy slaves1 using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. She later helped John Brown recruit men for his raid on Harpers Ferry, and in the post-war era struggled for women’s suffrage.

As a child in Dorchester County, Maryland, Tubman was beaten and whipped by her various masters to whom she had been hired out. Early in her life, she suffered a traumatic head wound when she was hit by a heavy metal weight thrown by an irate overseer, intending to hit another slave. The injury caused disabling seizures, headaches, powerful visionary and dream activity, and spells of hypersomnia which occurred throughout her entire life. A devout Christian, she ascribed her visions and vivid dreams to premonitions from God.

In 1849, Tubman escaped to Philadelphia, then immediately returned to Maryland to rescue her family. Slowly, one group at a time, she brought relatives with her out of the state, and eventually guided dozens of other slaves to freedom. Traveling by night and in extreme secrecy, Tubman (or “Moses”, as she was called) “never lost a passenger,” as she later put it at women’s suffrage meetings.2 Large rewards were offered for the capture and return of many of the people she helped escape, but no one ever knew it was Harriet Tubman who was helping them. When the far-reaching United States Fugitive Slave Law was passed in 1850, she helped guide fugitives farther north into Canada, and helped newly freed slaves find work.

When the American Civil War began, Tubman worked for the Union Army, first as a cook and nurse, and then as an armed scout and spy. The first woman to lead an armed expedition in the war, she guided the Combahee River Raid, which liberated more than seven hundred slaves. After the war, she retired to the family home in Auburn, New York, where she cared for her aging parents. She was active in the women’s suffrage movement until illness overtook her and she had to be admitted to a home for elderly African-Americans she had helped open years earlier

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Comments

  • shanghaiwu
    shanghaiwuover 4 years ago

    what an amazing and sad story/complete with your wonderful image combinations

  • thank you my friend, she was incredible, good day for you, gallo

    – arteology

  • lolowe
    loloweover 4 years ago

    Dude…I love your for making this t-shirt.

  • an incredible woman…….thank you for comment, hope all in brooklyn is well, gallo

    – arteology

  • eoconnor
    eoconnorover 4 years ago

    wonderful lady great quotes well done gallo !LIZ

  • thank you liz! great day for you, gallo

    – arteology

  • ellamental
    ellamentalover 4 years ago

    Thank you so much for sharing this!!!! There were things I didn’t know!!

  • like wise i learned many extra things about people i already admired, thank you for commenting and support, gallo

    – arteology

  • Sassafras
    Sassafrasover 4 years ago

    A personal , long time hero for me…a name spoken of at my childhood table …
    a shining example of resistance and persistence. And I thank you, once again, for this tee design.
    Ditto to lolowe’s comment.
    Peace,
    ~Sass

  • i thank you dear sister for adding her to this list! teamwork! love gallo

    – arteology

  • Sassafras
    Sassafras9 months ago

    BRAVO on your tee sale!!! Sooooooo glad for you.
    xo
    s

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