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The Raven…Nevermore

Anne Gitto

WHITING, United States

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“The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe”:http://www.houseofusher.net/raven.html

Analysis & Allusions of"The Raven" follows an unnamed narrator on a dreary night in December who sits reading “forgotten lore” as a way to forget the loss of his love, Lenore. The main theme of the poem is one of undying devotion. The narrator experiences a perverse conflict between desire to forget and desire to remember. He seems to get some pleasure from focusing on loss. The narrator assumes that the word “Nevermore”, spoken by the raven as Poe emphasizes the bird’s more dramatic qualities. Poe said the raven is meant to symbolize “Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance” as Poe had written a review in a Magazine saying, among other things, that the raven should have served a more symbolic, prophetic purpose. Poe may also have been drawing upon various references to ravens in mythology and folklore. In Norse mythology, Odin possessed two ravens named Huginn and Muninn, representing thought and memory. According to Hebrew folklore, Noah sends a white raven to check conditions while on the ark. It learns that the floodwaters are beginning to dissipate. Poe also mentions the Balm of Gilead, a reference to the Book of Jeremiah (8:22) in the Bible: “Is there no balm in Gilead; is there no physician there? why then is not the health of the daughter of my people recovered?” In that context, the Balm of Gilead is a resin used for medicinal purposes (suggesting, perhaps, that the narrator needs to be healed after the loss of Lenore). He also refers to “Aidenn”, another word for the Garden of Eden, though Poe uses it to ask if Lenore has been accepted into Heaven. At another point, the narrator imagines that Seraphim (a type of angel) have entered the room. The narrator thinks they are trying to take his memories of Lenore away from him using nepenthe, a drug mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey to induce forgetfulness. “The Raven” is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven’s mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man’s slow fall into madness…
“info from Wikipedia”:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Raven

This Raven was painted in watercolor on watercolor paper 9×12”.

John5 Jesus heals the lame man at the pools on the Sabbath. Jesus asks the man “Do you want to be healed?” ( John 5:6) An interesting question…The lame man had to want to be made well. And even though this man did not know who Jesus was, he was still healed. Usually faith was needed to be healed but in this case the man was made whole because Jesus’ power was not limited. Then later in the chapter Jesus confronts the man again (John 5:14 ) See you are well, again, so stop sinning or something worse will happen to you.
Mark 3 :35 whosoever does God’s will is my brother, mother and sister.

Artwork Comments

  • GEORGE SANDERSON
  • Anne Gitto
  • Lori Peters
  • Anne Gitto
  • Evita
  • Anne Gitto
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