Deck out your device with 15% off smartphone cases & laptop skins. Use code DEVICE15.

Taken with a Fuji S200 EXR

What is usually called the flower is actually a head (formally composite flower) of numerous florets (small flowers) crowded together. The outer florets are the sterile ray florets and can be yellow, maroon, orange, or other colors. The florets inside the circular head are called disc florets, which mature into seeds.

The florets within the sunflower’s cluster are arranged in a spiral pattern. Typically each floret is oriented toward the next by approximately the golden angle, 137.5°, producing a pattern of interconnecting spirals where the number of left spirals and the number of right spirals are successive Fibonacci numbers. Typically, there are 34 spirals in one direction and 55 in the other; on a very large sunflower there could be 89 in one direction and 144 in the other. This pattern produces the most efficient packing of seeds within the flower head.

Sunflowers most commonly grow to heights between 1.5 and 3.5 m (5–12 ft). Scientific literature reports that a 12 m (40 ft), traditional, single-head, sunflower plant was grown in Padua in 1567. The same seed lot grew almost 8 m (26 ft) at other times and places, including Madrid. During the 20th century, heights of over 8 m have been achieved in both Netherlands and Ontario, Canada.

All Products

flowers, garden, sunflower

Comments

  • Gary Heald LRPS
    Gary Heald LRPSover 4 years ago

    I saw your photo and thought how lovely it is. The I thought, I can tell the story about the 137.5 golden angle and the Fibonnacci series…………..You beat me too it!!! My day job is as a scientist and my original qualification were in Maths and Physics. I have always loved trying understand the beauty in nature, from a beautiful flower to the wonders of the Universe. Take a look the books on Chaos by prof Ian Stewart. There is also a great book called “Sync. The emerging science of spontaneous order”.

  • Thank you so much, these were sadly NOT in my garden, hugs Ann

    – AnnDixon

  • Pamela Phelps
    Pamela Phelpsover 4 years ago

    Gorgeous capture!

  • Thank you so much, these were sadly NOT in my garden, hugs Ann

    – AnnDixon

  • TxGimGim
    TxGimGimover 4 years ago

    Beautiful!

  • Thank you so much, these were sadly NOT in my garden, hugs Ann

    – AnnDixon

  • artwhiz47
    artwhiz47over 4 years ago

    A beautiful shot of a fascinating plant – efficiency personified!

  • Thank you so much, these were sadly NOT in my garden, hugs Ann

    – AnnDixon

  • billfox256
    billfox256over 4 years ago

    A golden blaze of glory!!!! Terrific shot!!!!, Bill

  • Thank you so much, these were sadly NOT in my garden, hugs Ann

    – AnnDixon

  • AuntDot
    AuntDotover 4 years ago

    A very beautiful portrayal of a great flower!

  • Thank you so much, these were sadly NOT in my garden, hugs Ann

    – AnnDixon

  • walstraasart
    walstraasartover 4 years ago

    Awesome, very beautiful work

  • Thank you so much, these were sadly NOT in my garden, hugs Ann

    – AnnDixon

  • Sean Farragher
    Sean Farragherover 4 years ago

    lovely shot

  • Thank you so much, these were sadly NOT in my garden, hugs Ann

    – AnnDixon

  • GregTS
    GregTSover 4 years ago

    Ann, Brilliant comp., colors, detail & photography!! Outstanding photo!!!
    Greg

  • Thank you so much Greg, these were sadly NOT in my garden, hugs Ann

    – AnnDixon

  • Kate Adams
    Kate Adamsover 4 years ago

    Gorgeous capture Ann!!

  • Thank you so much, these were sadly NOT in my garden, hugs Ann

    – AnnDixon

desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

10%off for joining

the Redbubble mailing list

Receive exclusive deals and awesome artist news and content right to your inbox. Free for your convenience.