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Absinthe traditionally has a natural green colour but may also be colourless. It is commonly referred to in historical literature as “la fée verte” (the green fairy). Although it is sometimes mistakenly referred to as a liqueur, absinthe is not traditionally bottled with added sugar, and is therefore classified as a spirit. Absinthe is traditionally bottled at a high level of alcohol by volume, but is normally diluted with water prior to being consumed.
It is an anise-flavoured spirit derived from botanicals, including the flowers and leaves of Artemisia absinthium (a.k.a. “grand wormwood”), together with green anise, sweet fennel, and other medicinal and culinary herbs.


Traditionally, absinthe is prepared by placing a sugar cube on top of a specially designed slotted spoon, and then placing the spoon on the glass which has been filled with a measure of absinthe. Iced water is then poured or dripped over the sugar cube in a manner whereby the water is slowly and evenly displaced into the absinthe, such that the final preparation contains 1 part absinthe and 3-5 parts water. As water dilutes the spirit, those components with poor water solubility (mainly those from anise, fennel, and star anise) come out of solution and cloud the drink. The resulting milky opalescence is called the louche.
The Bohemian Method is a recent invention that involves fire, and was not performed during absinthe’s peak of popularity in the Belle Époque. Like the French method, a sugar cube is placed on a slotted spoon over a glass containing one shot of absinthe. The sugar is pre-soaked in alcohol (usually more absinthe), then set ablaze. The flaming sugar cube is then dropped into the glass, thus igniting the absinthe. Finally, a shot glass of water is added to douse the flames. This method tends to produce a stronger drink than the French method. A variant of the Bohemian Method involves allowing the fire to extinguish on its own. This variant, sometimes referred to as “Cooking the Absinthe” or “Flaming Green Fairy,” destroys most of the alcohol. The origin of this burning ritual may borrow from a coffee and brandy drink that was served at Café Brûlot, in which a sugar cube soaked in brandy was set aflame.

Absinthe originated in the canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland in the late 18th century. It rose to great popularity as an alcoholic drink in late 19th- and early 20th-century France, particularly among Parisian artists and writers. Owing in part to its association with bohemian culture, the consumption of absinthe was opposed by social conservatives and prohibitionists. Ernest Hemingway, Charles Baudelaire, Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Amedeo Modigliani, Vincent van Gogh, Oscar Wilde, Aleister Crowley, Erik Satie and Alfred Jarry were all known absinthe drinkers.

Tags

absinth, euphoria, liquor, green, spirit, drink, bohemian

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Comments

  • ©The Creative  Minds
    ©The Creative ...12 months ago

  • ©The Creative  Minds
    ©The Creative ...12 months ago

  • Donna19
    Donna1912 months ago

    Oh the dreaded Green Fairy!! One must run or accept the inevitable doom about to descend…:))

  • I love the stuff :)

    – ©The Creative Minds

  • TomBaumker
    TomBaumker12 months ago

    Nice work my friend ! Hugs

  • Thanks Tom…hope you are well :)

    – ©The Creative Minds

  • CanyonWind
  • thanks for the feature in A+

    – ©The Creative Minds

  • ╰⊰✿ℒᵒᶹᵉ Bonita✿⊱╮ Lalonde✿⊱╮
  • thank you ! hugs back :)

    – ©The Creative Minds

  • This is Fife Scotland
    This is Fife S...12 months ago

    Ah Lovely work & super tasting we had, although not made properly in Romantic Restaurant. (Thats another story) I too like this drink very much Maybe you can make a much better drink soon to share Grand capture happy Praha..x

  • I would need an Absinth kit with parfait glass and absinthe spoon…oh and more Absinth of course :)

    – ©The Creative Minds

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