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Haunted House At Waterloo Village, Byram Township NJ, USA

Jane Neill-Hancock

Wayne, United States

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Artist's Description

Featured in Shelters Group, 2-Mar-2013

Top Ten Winner in Haunted Houses Challenge, Shelters Group, 15-Mar-2013

Waterloo Village is a restored 19th century canal town in Byram Township, Sussex County (west of Stanhope) in northwestern New Jersey and was approximately the half-way point in the roughly 102-mile (165 km) trip along the Morris Canal, which ran from Jersey City (across the Hudson River from Manhattan, New York) to Phillipsburg, New Jersey, US (across the Delaware River from Easton, Pennsylvania). Waterloo possessed all the accommodations necessary to service the needs of a canal operation, including an inn, a general store, a church, a blacksmith shop (to service the mules on the canal), and a watermill. For canal workers, Waterloo’s geographic location would have been conducive to being an overnight stopover point on the two-day trip between Phillipsburg and Jersey City, New Jersey.

It is currently an open air museum in Allamuchy Mountain State Park, Stanhope, New Jersey. Due to budget and management issues, it is only open on a limited basis.

Through a concession agreement with the NJDEP Division of Parks and Forestry, group tours and programs are available at Waterloo Village, Allamuchy Mountain State Park, by reservation with Winakung at Waterloo Inc. This includes Elementary School class trips, Summer Camp day trips, Scouts, and groups interested in Waterloo Village and Winakung, the recreated Lenape Indian Village. Tours are guided by expert period interpreters and are provided on a reserved basis from April through November.

Much of the principal photography for writer/director Michael Pleckaitis’ silent film Silent was done in November and December 2006 at various locations in the village.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~NOW – to my story of this haunted house!
NOW to this haunted house. In the early 1980s this village was open and doing very well as far as a tourist attraction – and there was a concert stage that had concerts all through the summer. I personally attended a concert for Emmy Lou Harris there that was phenomenal. My ex husband and I loved the village and visited a lot. We took photos and talked with the re-enactors.

On our first visit while in the Smith’s General Store at Waterloo Village the staff there first intimated that there were active ghosts in the village. Our experience with our house pictured here was really one of my first encounters with a ghost.

We were visiting at Christmas time in 1984. I was 6 months pregnant with my oldest daughter. We went up to the porch of this house and knocked on the door. there was a note on the door indicating that the house tour staff was on break and would return within the 1/2 hour. We decided to go back down to the road and wait by the front steps for them to return. We were talking and occasionally would look up at the house. We both saw the curtains move in the front window and a figure looking out at us so we went back up to the door and knocked, but no one came. about 45 minutes later someone came to the door. My husband was annoyed and asked why they had ignored us, that it was cold outside and his wife was 6 months pregnant and really needed to be let inside. the tour guide seemed surprised and said she had just come into the house through the back door. We explained about the curtains and the figure and she informed us that we had probably seen the resident ghost who lived in the house.

we were a bit startled but skeptical. We took the tour and when we got upstairs the tour guide again explained that there was a resident ghost who was not happy that people were touring the house and on some occasions they had had some incidents with this ghost. She explained that the ghost spent a lot of time in the sitting room looking at the window at village visitors, but that the ghost made its presence known quite often in other parts of the house. We completed the tour by going down the back stairs to the kitchen. As we started our descent, my husband nearly fell down the stairs in front of me. As I followed down after him the air on the stairs was freezing cold – like a draft from the outside was whoshing past me. When we got down to the kitchen my husband complained to me that he did not appreciate me pushing him when we were coming down the stairs. Of course I told him that I had not. the tour guide heard us and told us that people had been pushed on the back stairs by the ghost and that a horrible cold draft was felt when the ghost was around. the draft would be felt in the house before, during and after an incident would occur. So we both realized that my husband had been pushed by the ghost and I had felt it as it flew away from him and past me. Very creepy. We were not believers of ghosts yet, but we certainly now had both experienced something we could not explain. Since then I have had many other experiences with ghosts and I am a believer.

By the time I had the insight and wish to revisit the house again it was years later and was after 1988 and the village was closed. I am hoping that perhaps when the weather warms up this year 2013 I will be able to call and schedule a tour of that house again and take my camera to see if I am able to see or capture anything inside now. As you can see, this photo which I took of that house on a night walking visit with my daughter a few months ago, does make the house look very spooky, yes???

Artwork Comments

  • aprilann
  • Jane Neill-Hancock
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  • Jane Neill-Hancock
  • Sandra Fortier
  • Jane Neill-Hancock
  • Nicole W.
  • Jane Neill-Hancock
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