The Wildrose Charcoal Kilns by Anne-Marie Bokslag
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In 1877 George Hearst’s Modock Consolidated Mining Company completed construction of the charcoal kilns in Wildrose Canyon. The charcoal produced by the kilns was to be used as fuel for two silver-lead smelters that Hearst had built in the Argus Range 25 miles to the west. The kilns operated until the summer of 1878 when the Argus mines, due to deteriorating ore quality, closed and the furnaces shut down.The Wildrose kilns employed about 40 woodcutters and associated workmen, and the town of Wildrose, a temporary camp located somewhere nearby, was home to about 100 people. Remi Nadeau’s Cerro Gordo Freighting Company hauled the charcoal to the smelters by pack train and wagon. Each of the 10 kilns stands about 25 feet tall and has a circumference of approximately 30 feet. Each kiln held 42 cords of pinyon pine logs and would, after burning for a week, produce 2,000 bushels of charcoal. Considered to be the best surviving examples of such kilns to be found in the western states, the kilns owe their longevity to fine workmanship and to the fact that they were in use for such a short time.The Wildrose Charcoal kilns are located in Wildrose Canyon on the western side of Death Valley National Park. Access the Wildrose Canyon road from California Highway 178 between Trona and Panamint Springs. From California Highway 190, take the Emigrant Canyon road south to the turnoff up the Wildrose Canyon road to the kilns. The last 3 miles of the road are unpaved and the road is subject to storm closures.

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Featured in the Northern Californian Style , the Alphabet Soup and the Heritage in Stone group

Tags

travel, california, death_valley, anne_marie_bokslag

Comments

  • Pat Moore
    Pat Mooreover 5 years ago

    This is magnificent Anne-Marie!!!

  • Thank you very much Pat!

    – Anne-Marie Bokslag

  • kathy s gillentine
    kathy s gillen...over 5 years ago

    this is so cool, excellent shot and info

  • Thanks a lot Kathy!

    – Anne-Marie Bokslag

  • Cora Wandel
    Cora Wandelover 5 years ago

    Excellent as always, Anne-Marie!

  • Thank you so much Cora!

    – Anne-Marie Bokslag

  • stephaniek
    stephaniekover 5 years ago

    Terrific capture!! Like beehives!!

  • Thank you Steph, also for favouriting it ;-)

    – Anne-Marie Bokslag

  • E.R. Bazor
    E.R. Bazorover 5 years ago

    These are so cool. I thought at first I was looking at kilns in Italy.
    I had no idea they existed here.
    Wonderful photo!

  • Thank you Estes. I guess they are even pretty close to where you live he….lol!

    – Anne-Marie Bokslag

  • E.R. Bazor
    E.R. Bazorover 5 years ago


    Getting there would actually be a long drive for me…but it looks worth it!
    Wonderful photo!

  • Thank you Estes for this feature. Nice birthday present too …lol!

    – Anne-Marie Bokslag

  • Tama Blough
    Tama Bloughover 5 years ago

    Wow – they look like giant beehives. Congrats on your feature! I have never been to that area – sounds really interesting.

  • Thank you Tama! It’s worth going there, but don’t go in summer!

    – Anne-Marie Bokslag

  • Isa Rodriguez
    Isa Rodriguezover 5 years ago

    awesome!

  • Thank you Isa!

    – Anne-Marie Bokslag

  • Marie Sharp
    Marie Sharpover 5 years ago

    CONGRATULATIONS! THIS GREAT CAPTURE IS FEATURED IN ALPHABET SOUP!
    Please enter this image into the Best of K Challenge!
    Marie ~ Host

  • Thanks Marie!

    – Anne-Marie Bokslag

  • Michelle BarlondSmith
    Michelle Barlo...over 5 years ago

    BRAVO

  • Thanks ;-)

    – Anne-Marie Bokslag

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