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Wild Weald at Grym's Dyke by A90Six
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The Weald is an ancient wooded area that has remained relatively unchanged since.. ever. there are a few buildings mostly erected in the 19th century, one of which was the country home of W S Gilbert of Gilbert & Sullivan fame. The woods are full of dips mounds and hollows where clay gravel and sand were dug for the making of bricks.

The Weald area along with Harrow-on-the-Hill were used for brick-making. Although there were no brickearth deposits, claygate beds and pebble gravel on the higher areas of Harrow Weald and Harrow-on-the-Hill provided the necessary clay and sand. A brick-maker of Harrow-on-the-Hill is recorded in 1589, and the ‘surreptitious getting of a great quantity of sand’ to make bricks was an issue between Pitt and Gerard in the 1630s. Gerard, having clay but no sand at Flambards, took over 100 loads of sand from Pitt’s ground to make bricks, underselling Pitt by 6d. in the 1000. The castigation of this action as ‘against the custom of the country’ suggests that brick-making was already well established.

A brick-clamp in Weald Wood occurs in 1609–10, when, as ten years later, it was leased to Thomas Tibbald. By 1685 Matthew Bodymead owned a brick-, tile-, and lime-kiln on land leased to him on Weald Common near Bentley Corner. Other members of this old Weald family maintained brickworks throughout the 18th century at Harrow Weald, Harrow-on-the-Hill, and Pinner, until at the end of the century their property passed by marriage to the Blackwells. In 1767 and 1776 building bricks were the main product, but paving bricks and tiles were also made. The Blackwells flourished throughout the 19th century, their prosperity growing with the demand for suburban villas and workmen’s cottages. Several fine residences—Hillside, Brookside, and the Cedars—housed members of the family. Charles Blackwell built cottages for his own employees at the City of the Weald. In 1831 these housed 120 people, including the families of 26 brick-making labourers. Twenty years later there were 52 workers at the Weald works. In the 19th century the firm specialized in pots, pipes, and tiles. The Blackwells relinquished their interest in Harrow Weald in the 1890s, but brick-making continued at Clamp Hill into the next century. The Blackwell family name will be familiar to those in the UK from the food products made in association with the Crosse family. Crosse & Blackwell is a brand name that would be recognised by most in the UK.

Tags

landscape, trees, land, tree, scenery, england, view, scene, woods, common, triptych, middlesex, harrow, weald

Comments

  • DarkShadows
    DarkShadowsalmost 6 years ago

    Great Image!!!

  • Thanks V, glad you like it. :) Tony.

    – A90Six

  • hirst
    hirstalmost 6 years ago

    Wonderful image, love the treatment, it looks so exciting and mysterious!!

  • Thanks Shirley! I was going for the mysterious; slightly spooky; trolls, goblins & fairy look!
    :) Tony

    – A90Six

  • hirst
    hirstalmost 6 years ago

    You sure got it!!

  • Thanks Shirley! Let’s hope I can hang on to it!
    :) Tony.

    – A90Six

  • midzing
    midzingalmost 6 years ago

    brilliant work,,, well done

  • Thanks Wendy! I think one of your cadid back portrait models would have looked good in the middle distance.
    :) Tony.

    – A90Six

  • Lois  Bryan
    Lois Bryanalmost 6 years ago

    Crosse & Blackwell is familiar to us here in the good old US of A, as well. Another magical treatment, Tony … puts me in mind of wonderful painted lithographs … illustrations in children’s books of days gone by. (Grimm’s Fairy Tales among them, of course!)

  • Thanks Lois, I didn’t know the brand had crossed the pond. Well, this is where the Blackwell family came from. We have a Blackwell school and a park which he gave to the borough. there was a mansion house, which has long gone, but strangely the gates remain. I hope they’re still there – I’ll have to go and take a pic if they are.
    :) Tony.

    – A90Six

  • Mayina
    Mayinaalmost 6 years ago

    Stunning!!

  • Thanks Gwenda and thanks for the fave!
    :) Tony.

    – A90Six

  • amarica
    amaricaalmost 6 years ago

    Great information, fantastic capture Tony. :)

  • Thanks Ann! Glad you liked it. the history is partially what I knew and partially snatched from various history sites, but, for me, it makes the plave a little more interesting to know it has been around for so long. the stories it could tell!
    :) Tony.

    – A90Six

  • georgieboy98
    georgieboy98almost 6 years ago

    I very much like the way you have made this into a tryptych – most effective and eye catching. Peter

  • Thanks Peter! I thought there was interest in each third, that was missed as a whole. A triptych gives the best of both worlds!
    :) Tony.

    – A90Six

  • JayneLogan
    JayneLoganalmost 6 years ago

    Wonderful story and image .. cheers

  • Thanks Jayne!
    :) Tony.

    – A90Six

  • charlena
    charlenaalmost 6 years ago

    this is just stunning

  • Thanks Charlena!
    :) Tony.

    – A90Six

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