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Art Featuring Connections and Relationships!

F.A. Moore F.A. Moore 36152 posts

A typical neuron makes about ten thousand connections to neighboring neurons. Given the billions
of neurons, this means there are as many connections in a single cubic centimeter of brain tissue as
there are stars in the Milky Way galaxy.
” — David Eagleman, neuroscientist, New York Times bestselling author

A dream you dream alone is only a dream. A dream you dream together is reality.” — John Lennon


Connections and Relationships

 

Introduction

The distinction between Art and Craft came late to civilized societies. The oldest cultures did not have
words distinguishing the art of cooking, sculpting, painting, farming, or medicine-making. In ancient Greek
culture, all were art forms, using various “techniques”.

Thus there is reason for arguing that “Fine Art” is a construction of contemporary societies. In his book,
“The Invention of Art” (Univ. of Chicago Press, 2003), Larry Shiner writes that Art, “with a capital A”, meaning
Fine Art, was invented by the west in the eighteenth century. Others previously made the claim. Shiner is
inviting the reader, and art world, to use this as a basis to respond to all that makes up human expression.

This “richness of human expression” is the perspective from which we launch our discussion of “Connections”.

Impressionists
Relationships between Family and Friends

As Impressionist shows were mounted in the late 19th century, there were vibrant discussions (and dissensions)
on whether this was “Art”, as in “Fine Art”.

Impressionists were well known for expressing relationships at work and play, in other words, humans in their
natural environment of relationships. One has to wonder if it wasn’t the subject of the paintings that drove
the style— that is, this subject of naturalism and relationships.

Paintings by Edgar Degas and Mary Cassat reveal a shocking departure from the past, in art subject matter
not just differences in brush and color techniques, for which Impressionists are renowned.

 


Bureau du coton à la Nouvelle-Orléans by Edgar Degas
Cotton Exchange in New Orleans
ref


The Ballet 1872 by Edgar Degas
ref

Au Café-concert : La Chanson du chien by Edgar Degas
(At the Café-Concert: The Song of the Dog)
1875–1877
ref

The Child’s Bath by Mary Cassat
Oil on canvas, 1893
ref

Madame Meerson and Her Daughter by Mary Cassat
Paste on paper, 1899
ref

 

Regionalists
Relationships to work, war, social and geo-political events

In the early 20th century, particularly between 1920 and 1944, muralists painted in Regionalist styles,
depicting the character of centers of activity, and in particular, man and woman’s relationship to their
farm land or city, to their work, or to war, or political upheaval. The common man was at the center.
Mexican and American painters, in particular were drawn to this form.

In the early 1920s, Thomas Hart Benton (1889-1975), an American muralist and outspoken socialist,
disparaged “modernism”, and began painting in a style known today as Regionalism.

His representational America Today murals (1930-31) were donated to the Metropolitan Museum of Art,
where they are planned for a 2015 exhibition
. One of Benton’s students was Jackson Pollack, who is
said to have claimed that Benton’s traditional teachings “gave him something to rebel against”.
Jackson Pollack is renowned for fathering Abstract Expressionism.

Diego Rivera, considered the greatest Mexican painter of the 20th century, was a master muralist in this genre.
Grant Wood was a peer of Benton, and painted the relationship of the American mid-westerner to their farmland.


Achelous and Hercules by Thomas Hart Benton
Egg Tempera and Oil on canvas, affixed to plywood, 1947
22 × 5.25 feet (approx.)
ref


Cut the Line by Thomas Hart Benton
Oil on board, 1944
ref

 

—F.A. Moore

©2013, F.A. Moore.


 

Discussion

1. It is thought that the external relationships we have indicate the internal relationship that we have.

  1. Do you think there is truth in this?

2. We view our relationships— whether to human, animal, or environment, through the personal lens of our own conscious thoughts.

  1. Is art our endeavor to objectify these relationships by recording others’ relationships?

3. Regarding your own art, past and present:

  1. How would you rate the effectiveness of your art, which records your own relationships, versus your art which records the relationships of others? For example,
    1. Is it more difficult?
    2. Are you more critical of it?
    3. Do you find yourself “redoing” or fixing more than normal
    4. Are you happiest painting your own relationships, or “telling stories” about “others”?

 


 

Please enjoy our catalog and showcase of paintings from members, which we think shows Something Different.

Lynda Robinson is off this week; but she has cast her blessings on our team feature, which is brought to you, on behalf of all hosts and members of Women Painters.

—Frannie Moore


 

Catalog


Soul mates
by Tatjana Larina

 
Connection to a Soul Mate, Friend, or Spouse

Light of Buddha
by Yuliya Glavnaya

 
Spiritual Connection

Shelter from the Storm
by MoonSpiral

 
Connection to the Animal Kingdom

We Share the Same God Traditional Art in Watercolor
by deborah zaragoza

 
Connection to the Creator

In a relax afternoon
by Teresita Troya

 
Connection to House and Home

Nothing But Love
by Tahnja

 
Connection Between Animals

Pajupilli
by Annika Hiltunen

 
Connection to Music and Song

Storm Clouds and Strays
by Susan Bergstrom

 
Connection and Protection of the Lost

Love
by Lynda Harris

 
Connection Between Children and Baby Creatures

Child and Mother
by Katherine Appleby

 
Connection Between Mother and Child

Playground
by Martha Mitchell

 
The Happiness and Fun Connection

hula hoop
by LisaMM

 
Connection to One’s Sense of Play

Mozart’s Apprentice
by BarbBarcikKeith

 
Pet and Family Connection

A Starry Night in The Bronx
by helene ruiz

 
Artist’s Connection to Their Past

Swamp Ghost
by Monica Blatton

 
Connection to Our Own Angst and Fears

Inside the vortex of the premonitions
by Elena Kotliarker

 
Connection to Our Deep Subconscious

mermaid
by elisabetta trevisan

 
Connection to Our Dreams

Pan is Dead
by Constance Widen

 
Disconnection

 

 

Presenting “Connections and Relationships”, by Women Painters

  1. the curator’s “notes”, in bold below each work, represent a type of connection that comes strongly
    through the work, but is not necessarily the intent of the artist. You may see something different.

 


 


Soul mates
by Tatjana Larina

Acrylic and color ink on canvas

 
Connection to a Soul Mate, Friend, or Spouse


 


Light of Buddha
by Yuliya Glavnaya

Mixed: oil on canvas, iridescent colors, acrylic texture
61 × 91 cm.

 
Spiritual Connection


 


Shelter from the Storm
by MoonSpiral

Acrylic on panel
9 × 12 in.

 
Connection to the Animal Kingdom


 


We Share the Same God Traditional Art in Watercolor
by deborah zaragoza

Winsor Newton Watercolor on Cold Pressed Paper
30 × 22 in.

 
Connection to the Creator


 


In a relax afternoon
by Teresita Troya

Collage

 
Connection to House and Home


 


Nothing But Love
by Tahnja

Acrylic on stretched canvas
10 × 8 in.

 
Connection Between Animals


 


Pajupilli
by Annika Hiltunen

Colored pencils and soft pastels

 
Connection to Music and Song


 


Storm Clouds and Strays
by Susan Bergstrom

Acrylic Painting
16 × 20 in.

 
Connection and Protection of the Lost


 


Love
by Lynda Harris

Acrylics on paper

 
Connection Between Children and Baby Creatures


 


Child and Mother
by Katherine Appleby

Watercolour on recycled card

 
Connection Between Mother and Child


 


Playground
by Martha Mitchell

Oil on canvas,
100 × 75 cm (40 × 30 in.)

 
The Happiness and Fun Connection


 


hula hoop
by LisaMM

Ink on paper

 
Connection to One’s Sense of Play


 


Mozart’s Apprentice
by BarbBarcikKeith

Colored pencil, #9 in a series
12 × 9 in.

 
Pet and Family Connection


 


A Starry Night in The Bronx
by helene ruiz

Acrylic on canvas

 
Artist’s Connection to Their Past


 


Swamp Ghost
by Monica Blatton

Oil on canvas
30 × 40 cm.

 
Connection to Our Own Angst and Fears


 


Inside the vortex of the premonitions
by Elena Kotliarker

Mixed: Pastel chalks, acrylic on the sand texture, covered with varnish,
and finished with relief paint on canvas; palette knife technique

 
Connection to Deep Subconscious


 


mermaid
by elisabetta trevisan

Tempera and water-soluble pencils on MDF
90 × 50 cm

 
Connection to Our Dreams


 


Pan is Dead
by Constance Widen

Schmincke pastels on A3 Canson pastel paper

 
Disconnection


 

F.A. Moore F.A. Moore 36152 posts

Congratulations everyone! Constance Widen, Elisabetta Trevisan, Elena Kotliarker, Monica Blatton, Helene Ruiz, Barb Barcik-Keith, Lisa MM, Martha Mitchell, Katherine Appleby, Lynda Harris, Susan Bergstrom, Annika Hiltunen, Tanja, Teresita Troya, Deborah Zaragoza, Tammy (Moon Spiral), Yuliya Glavnaya, and Tatjana Larina

posting these now on your pages!


Madalena Lobao-Tello Madalena Lobao... 4445 posts

Wow!!!!
Congratulations Frannie, really a very interesting introduction with great points!
I see here the great question: “What is Art?”…The answer to this question has motivated artistic movements, friendships and hatreds within many artistic movements.
Great selections of artworks. Really enjoy admiring great talent here!

Congratulations! Constance Widen, Elisabetta Trevisan, Elena Kotliarker, Monica Blatton, Helene Ruiz, Barb Barcik-Keith, Lisa MM, Martha Mitchell, Katherine Appleby, Lynda Harris, Susan Bergstrom, Annika Hiltunen, Tanja, Teresita Troya, Deborah Zaragoza, Tammy (Moon Spiral), Yuliya Glavnaya, and Tatjana Larina

F.A. Moore F.A. Moore 36152 posts

Madalena, thank you so much for your leadership of this great group, and your support of our team features and articles!

Conoro Conoro 144 posts

To be featured with such an array of very talented artists is a huge compliment Frannie and Mada, to know that my painting has been LOOKED at and understood is one of the best things that can happen to a painter! Thank you for seeing and featuring me, congratulations to the amazing painters who are here on this page :-)

deborah zaragoza deborah zaragoza 1841 posts

Thank you so very much to our two awesome hosts, F.A.Moore, and Madalena! I am so honored to be among some of the greatest artists here on Redbubble. I just now got back from a road trip and totally surprised by the two features! The images are so wonderful from my fellow artists and I will spend today looking at each wonderful piece and commenting on these outstanding works.

Cheers to all,
deborah zaragoza

Beatrice Cloake Beatrice Cloake 7754 posts

Congratulations to all featured artists.
Frannie thank you for this most absorbing and brain scratching search into your questions.
I have not seen any answers yet!!!

1. It is thought that the external relationships we have indicate the internal relationship that we have.
■Do you think there is truth in this?
I would say YES – People around us affect our lives either by their kindness or their problems etc… We have only to look at the news on TV. We are affected by the famine seen in parts of the world, wars, disasters.
Friends may need us, family surely do!
We are affected by our youth, people who have brought us up. Their characters either have affected us positively or negatively.

■Is art our endeavor to objectify these relationships by recording others’ relationships?

It is inevitable! We are touched by our surroundings and relationships. Strangely enough, when I have been hurt by others, I have locked myself in my studio and worked harder than ever, trying to forget …

3. Regarding your own art, past and present:
■How would you rate the effectiveness of your art, which records your own relationships, versus your art which records the relationships of others? For example,■Is it more difficult?
■Are you more critical of it?
■Do you find yourself “redoing” or fixing more than normal
■Are you happiest painting your own relationships, or “telling stories” about “others”?

Tricky one this long question. I surely be more critical of my art if I paint a portrait of a friend. Have I worked hard enough, not only to produce the likneness but have I been kind towards the translation. Not everybody is happy with showing “a hard face” or too many wrinkles etc..

I would be happier to paint my own relationships, it is all in the pleasure of my surroundings.

F.A. Moore F.A. Moore 36152 posts

Great to see you Deborah and Constance.

@Deborah, your lion is so noble and utterly beautiful. It’s great to see your wildlife watercolor. I hope you
do more and submit them to Women Painters. Traditional is the ticket here, and we would love to see
more of your traditional work.

@Constance, I was taken by your nod to Browning’s poem, and the impassioned, (yet unspoken) plea to
reconnect with meaningfulness, passion, dignity, love, humanity; and, yes, nature (which we profoundly
affect with our attitudes of all of the above).

F.A. Moore F.A. Moore 36152 posts

@Beatrice, we must have been writing at the same time! Great to see you here, and thank you for starting
off the discussion!

You know your response to #2, makes me want to know these paintings you have painted when you
were hurt, and locked away, expressing yourself, “trying to forget”. I wonder if you saw this come out in
any way, within the painting itself— some form of expressing that hurt, or relationship.

This is a very typical reaction for poets, too. It’s possible that this response produces some of the
greatest works. But, without the artists’ input, we may never know. LIFE!

So you enjoy painting your own relationships. I can see this in your charming paintings of your township,
and of your family and friend’s little ones.

What you said about painting portraits and being kind in the translation makes sense, when you take into
consideration the meaning of the portrait to the subject and their family— that is, it is a means to honor
and remember them, when they are gone, even while the portrait is being enjoyed today.

Beatrice Cloake Beatrice Cloake 7754 posts

For you Frannie, here are some of the paintings created in my “locked” room… there are a lot more…
Strangely enough I did not see the hurt in my work, the reason being that I was escaping in my dreamy world where I have always found comfort :)

On this Earth, we meet so many good people but also so many critical sorts that like to hurt others for no other reasons than they cannot see how much good can be done around them just by being kind and happy.
We are so lucky, we can give so much with our Art: Joy, happiness, creativity, sharing and much more.


St Mary's Bay – Kent
by Beatrice Cloake N.A.P.A


HASTINGS – the fishermen's beach
by Beatrice Cloake N.A.P.A


On the nest
by Beatrice Cloake N.A.P.A

F.A. Moore F.A. Moore 36152 posts

Beatrice, I don’t see the hurt either. It’s amazing! And these are beautiful. Thank you!

JolanteHesse JolanteHesse 489 posts

Congratulations All!

Madalena Lobao-Tello Madalena Lobao... 4445 posts

Beatrice

You always have words and works right.
It is true that through our work, we have the great possibility of showing connections and relacciones that sometimes, in reality, are not very visible.

Beatrice Cloake Beatrice Cloake 7754 posts

So very true Madalena :)

Tere Troya Tere Troya 495 posts

First I ´m so happy and grateful to be featured with all the other participant with his great works!

About the Discussion:
*About the external relationships: I consider that everything touchs us, the enviroment and our personal relations, although sometimes we do not realize

*About if it´s truth in this: That´s a very personal point of view: some people prefer to work in ideal situation, other to work with what happens inside each one, others to paint the reality as they live…It´s very complicated …On my own, I prefer to show what I think, what I need…Art ir my cavern in life, that makes me feel save and also feel connected with myself and don´t feel alone

*The last point: I don´t have a real time on my work, it just happens somewhere in time…and I’m very critical of myself, until I see my work reached maximum expression in what I show, I keep working on it even if it takes months!

Thanks so much Fran and Mada for all your work, it´s a great group!!!

F.A. Moore F.A. Moore 36152 posts

Teresita, I enjoyed reading your responses here. Thanks for joining in.

Today I was just thinking that I really want this certain oil painting to be finished ( I like it in its present state);
but deep inside I know it is not ready, not the best it can be. And I was wondering… am I impatient?
Your words are exactly what I needed today (“…I keep working on it even if it takes months!”—Teresita Troya) Thank you!

helene ruiz helene ruiz 2722 posts

congrats everyone! and thank you for the feature as well!

Yuliya Glavnaya Yuliya Glavnaya 61 posts

Thank you so much Fran and Madalena for your great work, it´s very interesting group!!! Congratulations to all featured artists!

F.A. Moore F.A. Moore 36152 posts

You are very welcome, @Helene, and also @Yuliya!

Tere Troya Tere Troya 495 posts

@Fran so glad that my words can help you!…
I give you just a suggestion:

  • Why don´t copy yourself and do another exactly at the point it´´s right now? And continue working on one of them?
  • Another posibility is meanwhile you´r trying to “see inside” what you really want, begin another work , and allow it to develop in your dreams while you are working on other…

Just ideas that I did-do when I feel I’m stuck at a point
Have a nice Sunday!

F.A. Moore F.A. Moore 36152 posts

Thanks, Teresita. I would not have thought of your “suggestion #1” (copy your own painting, and progress with one
or the other). This is a neat idea, although it would not work for me, for various reasons that I won’t bore you with. :D

Your “suggestion #2” is what I do currently, normally with 4 paintings in various stages of drying. It allows time for
my sub- and conscious mind to work on them. Interestingly though, I have been focused on this particular piece,
rather than returning to my other pieces, as normal. So that is probably my answer. ;) Thank you!

LisaMM LisaMM 1488 posts

I read this wonderful post a few days ago and have been meaning to return earlier to post a response. I want to thank you, Frannie, for including my work in this amazing feature and i would also like to thank you for all the work you have put into this. The research is wonderful as are the posted samples of art. I thoroughly enjoyed reading your narrative, so insightful and informative. I love the questions you pose, causing us to contemplate and to reflect within, as to our own motivations in what we create. I am not very good at pin pointing myself or my work into anything specific and sometimes, there is no reason at all to a drawing I’ve done, other than, the image appeared in my mind and i had to draw it. I have never really considered my work to be influenced by relationships, per say, but again, upon reflection, i can see that indirectly, they do, for much of my work is influenced by emotions, how i feel about people, circumstances and the world around me. Interesting forum Fran….thank you for opening up discussions such as this….i feel it is an important part of an art community, to be able to discuss all that art encompasses. :-) . Congratulations to all artists featured. Wonderful work.

F.A. Moore F.A. Moore 36152 posts

@Lisa, if the article and accompanying works have made you stop to consider your own art,
and its influences from within or without, then that is something. Art IS that way, for artists,
as you have described: personal, and often elusive to deeper meaning or connections.
Especially for the art that is so personal, it can be illuminating to consider that something is
actually behind it— be it thought, reasoning, experience, or a flow of emotion. I hope that you
enjoyed pausing to wonder about your own. Thanks for joining the discussion, and also for
your praise of the article. I appreciate it.