Utah Landscapes

Featuring the best landscape photography that Utah has to offer

Recent Work

  • Zion - 2-1 by BGSPhoto
  • Across the desert's edge by Brent Olson
  • Red--Colors of the southwest by Nancy Richard
  • Desert Epic by Harry Oldmeadow
  • Canyon Outlandish original painting by CrowRisingMedia
  • Valley of The Navajo by JohnDSmith
  • No Trespassin' by Brent Olson
  • Going To The Sun by Ann  Van Breemen
  • ARCHES NATIONAL PARK UTAH by Thomas Barker-Detwiler
  • RELIC by Thomas Barker-Detwiler
  • Entrada Sandstone Formations by Alex Preiss
  • Delicate Arch-Panorama by Alex Preiss

About This Group

We are looking for the best landscape photography and art that Utah has to offer. From the alpine to the red rocks. Utah is a very diverse place. Please join us in showcasing it’s beauty. Good light and happy bubbling everyone!!.

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“May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds.” -Edward Abbey
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UTAH STATE SYMBOLS
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flower:……………………………. sego lily
tree:……………………………….. blue spruce
bird:………………………………… California gull
emblem:…………………………… beehive
song:………………………………. “Utah, We Love Thee”
gem:……………………………….. topaz
animal:…………………………….. Rocky Mountain elk
insect:…………………………….. honeybee
grass:……………………………… Indian rice grass
fossil:………………………………. allosaurus
cooking pot:……………………… dutch oven
fish:………………………………… Bonneville cutthroat trout
fruit:…………………………………cherry
mineral:…………………………….copper
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Utah is generally rocky with three distinct geological regions: the Rocky Mountains, the Great Basin, and the Colorado Plateau. Utah is known for its natural diversity and is home to features ranging from arid deserts with sand dunes to thriving pine forests in mountain valleys.

One of Utah’s defining characteristics is the variety of its terrain. Running down the northern center of the state is the Wasatch Range, which rises to heights of about 12,000 feet (3,650 m) above sea level. Portions of these mountains receive more than 500 inches (12.7 m) of snow each year and are home to world-renowned ski resorts, made popular by the light, fluffy snow, which is considered good for skiing. In the northeastern section of the state, running east to west, are the Uinta Mountains, which rise to heights of 13,000 feet (3,950 m) or more. The highest point in the state, Kings Peak, at 13,528 feet (4,123 m), lies within the Uinta Mountains. At the western base of the Wasatch Range is the Wasatch Front, a series of valleys and basins that are home to the most populous parts of the state. The major cities of Ogden, Salt Lake City, Layton, West Valley City, Sandy, West Jordan, Orem, and Provo are located within this region, which stretches approximately from Brigham City at the north end to Nephi at the south end. Approximately 75 percent of the population of the state lies in this corridor, and urban sprawl continues to expand along the edges of these valleys.

Western Utah is mostly arid desert with a basin and range topography. Small mountain ranges and rugged terrain punctuate the landscape. The Bonneville Salt Flats are an exception, being comparatively flat as a result of once forming the bed of ancient Lake Bonneville. Great Salt Lake, Utah Lake, Sevier Lake, Rush Lake and Utah Lake are all remnants of this ancient freshwater lake, which once covered most of the eastern Great Basin. West of the Great Salt Lake, stretching to the Nevada border, lies the arid Great Salt Lake Desert.

Much of the scenic southern and south eastern landscape (specifically the Colorado Plateau region) is sandstone, specifically Kayenta sandstone and Navajo sandstone. The Colorado River and its tributaries wind their way through the sandstone, creating some of the world’s most striking and wild terrain. Wind and rain have also sculpted the soft sandstone over millions of years. Canyons, gullies, arches, pinnacles, buttes, bluffs, and mesas are the common sight throughout south-central and southeast Utah. This terrain is the central feature of protected state and federal parks such as Arches, Bryce Canyon, Canyonlands, Capitol Reef, and Zion national parks, Cedar Breaks, Grand Staircase-Escalante, Hovenweep, and Natural Bridges national monuments, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (site of the popular tourist destination, Lake Powell), Dead Horse Point and Goblin Valley state parks, and Monument Valley (a popular photographic and filming site). The Navajo Nation also extends into southeastern Utah.

Southwestern Utah is the lowest and hottest spot in Utah. It is known as Utah’s Dixie because early settlers were able to grow limited amounts of cotton there. Beaverdam Wash in far southwestern Utah is the lowest point in the state, at 2,000 feet (610 m). The northernmost portion of the Mojave Desert is also located in this area. Dixie is quickly becoming a popular recreational and retirement destination, and the population is growing rapidly. Just north of Dixie is the state’s highest ski resort, Brian Head.

Eastern (northern quarter) Utah is a high-elevation area covered mostly by plateaus and basins. Economies are dominated by mining, shale oil, oil, and natural gas-drilling, ranching, and recreation. Much of eastern Utah is part of the Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation. The most popular destination within northeastern Utah is Dinosaur National Monument near Vernal.

Like most of the Western and Southwestern states, the federal government owns much of the land in Utah. Over 70 percent of the land is either BLM land, Utah State Trustland, or U.S. National Forest, U.S. National Park, U.S. National Monument, National Recreation Area or U.S. Wilderness Area.

See the group rules and join this group here