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Traditional Painters In Modern Times - TWO PER DAY

Painters in Modern Times is a group which endeavours to showcase the best of our hand painted works. - *Two per day*

When you frame acrylic art on canvas board-should you NOT use glass????

m catherine doherty m catherine do... 79 posts

I have some acrylics to frame and I have heard you should not use glass-all have a mat to separate the work from the glass,BUT I have read elsewhere you need 1/4" space between the glass and paint! I am sooo confused now!

BarbBarcikKeith BarbBarcikKeith 480 posts

The only thing I know for sure doesn’t use glass are the oil paintings. Never used acrylics so not sure.. but I do know that if you’re going to frame it, it does need to have space between it and the glass or else the image will start to come off onto the glass… something you really don’t want to have happen. Don’t know if that helped or made your confusion worse…

m catherine doherty m catherine do... 79 posts

Thank you- Barb !-I kinda believe the sticking to the glass thing-which I do not want to experience!I do have a space-but not 1/4 of an inch-I may just skip the glass to avoid possible disaster!!!!

Cindy Schnackel Cindy Schnackel 4942 posts

Hi, I paint in acrylics and here’s what I do.

Acrylic paintings on canvas and canvas board, panels, etc never get glass. Just frame them. You can ask at a frame shop about any spacers or thin protectors but usually once acrylic is thoroughly dry and cured it won’t stick to the frame. It can take awhile to really cure, a process that goes on for weeks or even months after a painting is “dry.”

Works on PAPER, though, usually need to be framed under glass. (Including acrylic paint on paper.) They will need backing, etc, too. There are spacers and extra thick mats to keep it well separated from the glass. You definitely want to make sure the paint on paper is thoroughly dry and cured, too, because if it’s still giving off moisture or chemicals, bad things can happen when it’s trapped under glass. Never let any art touch the glass. If your painting is on paper, consider having a good framer mount it on an acid free backing board and skipping the mat, just use a good spacer. Some papers edges are meant to show, like deckle or natural edges.

scallyart scallyart 162 posts

I agree with Cindy. If my acrylic are on canvas or board, I do not put them under glass, but if they are on paper, I then put them on glass with a mount the same as a watercolour painting. Regards Kerry

BarbBarcikKeith BarbBarcikKeith 480 posts

I just have some questions for those of you who do NOT use glass on your acrylics.. what about dirt, cooking grease, nicotine? Will those not stick to the acrylic (and change the colors considerably)? I know they stick to oils but you can be kinda rough when it comes to cleaning oils – again, I don’t know anything about acrylics so I’m playing devil’s advocate for those of us out here that are in the same boat.

m catherine doherty m catherine do... 79 posts

Thank you for the help to all-I double matted and made spacers and will let painting dry for a few more days! In the future I will not use glass.But now and then I do like them matted so I have to use linen ? mat board with out glass?

Cindy Schnackel Cindy Schnackel 4942 posts

I try not to expose my art to smoke, etc, but in some homes they will get exposed to those things. So, all my acrylic paintings that won’t be under glass are finished with clear gloss acrylic polymer medium & varnish. (Liquitex, Golden, and Tri Art are 3 brands for example.) For many artists this is considered an ‘isolation coat’ before applying a spirit based varnish. More recent thinking on acrylics seems to be that they should only be finished with 100% acrylic polymer. Also, I use gloss medium/varnish as it is the most transparent. If a less shiny surface is wanted, the last varnish coat can be matte or semi gloss. Avoid additives to slow down drying and level out brush strokes because IMO most make the final finish softer. Varnishing in our desert climate means I have to water down the varnish just a bit, work fast with a wide, soft brush, avoid brushing back into it. Sometimes I even have to varnish paintings in the bathroom after a shower has raised the humidity in there. Work on paper typically does not get a varnish coat, but if or when I do use acrylic mediums on paper I tend to use matte, because it matches the paper better as far as gloss level.

jandavies jandavies 3 posts

I do the same as scallyart and I have used acrylics for several years and never had any problems using mount and glass, if the painting is on paper, or using varnish and no glass if the painting is on canvas or board. The canvas can be wiped with a damp cloth to clean it if needed. My problem is that I forget to leave a border when painting on paper, then the mount covers some needed detail. If you paint on deep box canvas, and paint around the edges, it can be hung with out framing, using screws in wall, so that canvas lies flat. Does any one have opinion about hanging shallow canvas this way too? I have a photo of painted edges on my website, www.janetdaviesartist.co.uk on my ILLUSTRATED PAINTING DEMO page.

Cindy Schnackel Cindy Schnackel 4942 posts

I also use some deep canvases & cradled panels, and paint the edges, especially on large work because a large frame would be ridiculously expensive and probably not even look right.

As for hanging hardware, I use D rings and wire. Every gallery I’ve put work in seems to want that. I put the rings on the back fairly close to the top, (varies with the size of the art). A lot of galleries have a cable hanging system that makes art tilt way out from the wall unless the hanging hardware is pretty high. Yes, hanging large work from two hooks is much better, and very easy to level large paintings hung from a wire across two hooks.

Janet, LOL, I do the same thing on drawings, especially since I often draw without a plan. For that reason will need to mount a lot of things on a backing board and let the paper edges show, like watercolorists do when they frame full sheets of deckle edged paper. IF I am thinking ahead enough, I mount nice paper to a cradled panel with gel medium and press it down and get it nice and smooth. This makes a good painting surface that can usually be varnished like a painting and go frameless. If you do this, EXPERIMENT first, as there are some papers, mediums and techniques that will not hold up to it. But it is a way to get the look and feel of paper and drawing mediums into your work without having to put it under glass all the time.

The reason hanging the standard canvases without a frame doesn’t look as nice is one of proportion, and also warping. The thinness of it often doesn’t look right. Also the thin canvases are never perfectly flat, they can have a little twist to them and look warped, especially large canvases. Framing takes care of that. If you did a work you love on a thin canvas, you might consider carefully unstapling it and restretching it on thicker bars, though of course you could lose some of the edge.

Going to art shows I am looking at how other artists solve these things as much as I’m looking at the art. Some people mount art on unusual and inexpensive materials. One artist was hanging her paintings without even stretcher bars, just grommets and neatly finished edges. However, I wasn’t really impressed with the way her art kind of curled…that part she hadn’t fully solved. Nevertheless it seems many artists are trying to find a way around expensive framing. When a shop told me they’d charge me $140 to frame a miniature painting I got busy looking for alternatives, bargains, etc, too.

Carson Collins Carson Collins 639 posts

The only instance in which I would even consider putting acrylic under glass is when it’s used like watercolor on paper. Another exception is that it can be use to paint on glass. Acrylic used as one would use oil on canvas should not be under glass.

Cindy Schnackel Cindy Schnackel 4942 posts

Carson, that’s a wonderful painting!

Carson Collins Carson Collins 639 posts

Thank you. It’s on the windows of the Bell Buoy seafood store (Hartill Brothers’ Cannery) in Seaside, Oregon, where I worked for 3 years: 2001 – 2004.

m catherine doherty m catherine do... 79 posts

Great input here-I have certainly learned much these past weeks! Leaving borders and painting on surfaces that are traditional sizes-so I can use ready made frames when needed!!! Thank you all !!!