Shop

Warmbloods Of The World (Breed Specific!)

What lovely equines they are.

Recent Work

  • The Laughing Cavalier --- SLM Flirting "Maxie" by Jean Farquhar
  • Dressage No.6 - Grey Stallion in Focus by Nina Smart
  • Oaks Redwood  by Jean Farquhar
  • Caro Mio "Chelsea" by Jean Farquhar
  • Quantador, Hanoverian Stallion by Jean Farquhar
  • Quantador, Hanoverian Stallion by Jean Farquhar
  • Quality Street,  by Jean Farquhar
  • Chelsea by Jean Farquhar
  • Ramblehom Free Spirit (Warmblood Colt) by Brian Edworthy
  • Fury by louisegreen
  • Sandhurst, Oldenburg Stallion by Jean Farquhar
  • Friesian Stallion - "The Wizzard" by louisegreen

About This Group

*This will be the place to showcase all your lovely captures of a true sport horse of SPECIFIC warmblood breeding.

The definition of Warmblood:
Warmblood does not specify a certain blood temperature, but the average temper of light to medium heavy riding and cart horse breeds. These breeds originate in crosses of Thoroughbred horses with rural or draft horses or from mixtures of different warmblood breeds. After some time these crosses have stabilised their appearance into distinct breeds. As they originate from different lines with different purposes, the appearance of the warmblood breeds lies between the extremes Thoroughbred and draft horse.
Warmbloods have smaller heads and bodies than draft horses and tend to be less excitable than hot blooded horses, making them good all-round horses for riding and light work. They are popular in Olympic sporting events such as dressage, and many European breeders are breeding warmbloods for competition. The Hanoverian is one breed currently popular for eventing.
The Oldenburg, developed from the crossings of Friesians, Hannoverians, Normans, Cleveland Bays and Thoroughbreds was at one point Germany’s most popular coach horse. Early in the twentieth Century as the market for coach horses collapsed, the Oldenburgs were more regularly used as a versatile agricultural horse, a role they remained in until the Second World War. After the war breeders made a focused effort to lighten Oldenburgs. Since the complete reworking of type and quality, Oldenburgs are now recognized as one of the most successful breeds in Germany and North America. It’s young stock are sought after as competition horses and breeding stock. worldwide.

See the group rules and join this group here

Your Hosts